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Topic modeling identifies topics, and it also provides a proportional breakdown of the often multiple topics that each individual article or advertisement addressed. This chart shows the changing percentage of print space for this topic in the paper as a whole—for each month the topic proportions for "[unclear]" in all articles containing that topic are added together and then divided by the total number of pieces published that month to calculate a percentage value.

You can also adjust the articles that the above chart takes into account. By default, articles and advertisements that have only a small proportion of their content in this category are included in the chart. Each individual article has a negligible effect, but small proportions in dozens or hundred of articles can add up. Use the controls below the chart to adjust the threshold of the articles charted. You can also choose to chart the summation of the topic proportion of all articles (which makes sense for a topic that's more of a theme) or you can choose to chart the raw count of all articles above your specified threshold (which might be preferable when looking at a topic that's more generic in nature). For the latter kind of chart, you'll likely want to adjust the threshold to something like 20% or 30%.

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Predictive Words

GREAT TIME PRESENT GOOD MEANS FACT DOUBT PUBLIC LONG MAKE MADE CONDITION HOPE IMPORTANT WORK FIND TIMES MATTER PART SUBJECT RESULT FOUND VIEW OPINION

This list of words are those that the topic model identifies as most likely to appear in documents in this category.

Exemplary Articles

article
57%
1
Saturday, January 12, 1861

The Sugar Refinery.

—This enterprise, one of the most prominent among those to which an impetus was given by the events of 1859, has, we are gratified to say, proved entirely successful. The proprietor, in the course of time, will doubtless be encouraged to enlarge his facilities of operation. . . . more

The Sugar Refinery.

—This enterprise, one of the most prominent among those to which an impetus was given by the events of 1859, has, we are gratified to say, proved entirely successful. The proprietor, in the course of time, will doubtless be encouraged to enlarge his facilities of operation. The present steady and constant demand speaks well for the quality of the articles produced at the refinery.

article
50%
2
Tuesday, July 09, 1861

Sickness.

—It is understood that considerable sickness, of a mild, though temporarily debilitating kind, prevails in this city at the present time. The complaints are most generally those consequent on the summer season; yet are very annoying and painful while they last,

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50%
3
Monday, April 07, 1862
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50%
4
Friday, November 02, 1860

W. D. Totty.

—It is stated that this unfortunate man received the intelligence of his respite with calmness, and exhibited a disposition to improve the allotted time by preparing for his doom.

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50%
5
Saturday, November 24, 1860

A Great Reform Commenced.

—We are pleased to find that the practice of making the scholars learn all their lessons during school hours has been adopted in a portion of our public schools, and it will, doubtless, be extended to them all. We hope that this step is . . . more

A Great Reform Commenced.

—We are pleased to find that the practice of making the scholars learn all their lessons during school hours has been adopted in a portion of our public schools, and it will, doubtless, be extended to them all. We hope that this step is but the beginning of a great reform, and that the whole practice of stuffing the mind with a mass of undigested matter will be abandoned. An eager desire to make a great show for the time or for the money expended is the most pernicious vice of our educational system; it leads to a hasty slurring over of lessons half understood and begets a habit of being satisfied with vague ideas, which is very apt to continue through life. The most rapid mode of teaching is that which requires every lesson to be thoroughly mastered and comprehended before it is passed by. A scholar with this habit of study will soon overtake another who is far in advance with crude and superficial notions of his studies. If parents or teachers are very anxious that a child should learn rapidly, let them insist that the lessons shall be few and short; no more than the child can learn both thoroughly and easily.—Scientific American.

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50%
6
Monday, August 10, 1863

...

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49%
7
Monday, February 03, 1862

The Convention of Railroad Officers.

The near approach of the day for the assembling of the Convention to devise measures for a supply of railroad materials, renders it almost unnecessary that we should again call attention to its importance, for doubtless the press throughout the South have urged it in . . . more

The Convention of Railroad Officers.

The near approach of the day for the assembling of the Convention to devise measures for a supply of railroad materials, renders it almost unnecessary that we should again call attention to its importance, for doubtless the press throughout the South have urged it in their columns with a view to securing a full representation. A casual glance at the subject, even, will convince a reflecting mind of the necessity of the prompt adoption of some measures to guard against the possible calamity of an interruption in some indispensable chain of railway, by the wearing out of working materials which could not, without great inconvenience, be supplied. There is no class of men so well qualified to take this work in hand, as those who, by long experience, fully appreciate the minutest necessities of matters under their immediately control. We hope, therefore, that on the 5th of the present month, every railroad in the Confederate States will be represented in the meeting in this city.

article
48%
8
Monday, June 16, 1862

Good Breeding

—There is nothing more difficult to attain, or necessary to possess, than perfect good breeding, which is equally inconsistent with a stiff formality, an impertinent forwardness, and awkward bashfulness. A little ceremony is sometimes necessary; a certain degree of firmness is absolutely so, end an awkward modesty . . . more

Good Breeding

—There is nothing more difficult to attain, or necessary to possess, than perfect good breeding, which is equally inconsistent with a stiff formality, an impertinent forwardness, and awkward bashfulness. A little ceremony is sometimes necessary; a certain degree of firmness is absolutely so, end an awkward modesty is extremely unbecoming. In mixed companies, whoever is admitted to take part in them, is, for the time at least, supposed to be upon a footing of equality with the rest, and, consequently, every one claims, and very justly, every mark of civility and good breeding.—None is allowed, but carelessness and negligence are strictly forbidden. There is nothing so little forgiven as a seeming in attention to the person who is a making to you. We have seen many people, who, while you are speaking to them, instead of looking at and attending to you, fix their eyes upon the ceiling or some other part of the room, look out at the window, lift a book or newspaper, and read it. Nothing discovers a little,, frivolous mind more than this, and nothing is so offensively ill- bred. Be assured that the profoundest learning, without breading, is unwelcome and tiresome . A man who is not well-bred isn't fit for good society, and is unwelcome in it. Make then, good breeding the great object of your thoughts and actions. Observe carefully the behavior and manner of those who are distinguished by their good breeding. endeavor to excel, that you may at least equal them. —Observe how it adorns merit, and how often it covers the want of it.

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47%
9
Wednesday, February 17, 1864

Surprises.

We hope never more to hear of surprises of Confederate soldiers. Our military leaders and commanders should lend all their energies and vigilance to the avoidance hereafter of the greatest and almost fatal defect which has hitherto paralyzed the efficiency of our arms. The officer who permits him self . . . more

Surprises.

We hope never more to hear of surprises of Confederate soldiers. Our military leaders and commanders should lend all their energies and vigilance to the avoidance hereafter of the greatest and almost fatal defect which has hitherto paralyzed the efficiency of our arms. The officer who permits him self to be surprised, or who even suffers his men to relax their watchfulness, ought to be stripped of his epaulets and detailed for work in a stone quarry.

article
45%
10
Thursday, November 19, 1863

Future of the War.

An intelligent gentleman, who has recently visited the U. S., and has had unusual opportunities of observation, expresses the conviction that the North, unless some unexpected advantage of great importance shall be obtained by its arms, or some great misfortune be brought upon us by our . . . more

Future of the War.

An intelligent gentleman, who has recently visited the U. S., and has had unusual opportunities of observation, expresses the conviction that the North, unless some unexpected advantage of great importance shall be obtained by its arms, or some great misfortune be brought upon us by our own folly, will not be able much longer to conduct the war upon its present dimensions. He is of opinion that the North is much nearer exhaustion than the South. Their bluster and bravado will increase in proportion as their strength diminishes, but if we are true to ourselves, patient, persistent and harmonious, the worst of our danger, with the blessing of Heaven, will soon be over.—Such at least is the opinion of one whose name, if we could give it, would carry with it no ordinary weight.

In this column are pieces from the Daily Dispatch that best exemplified this topic; i.e. they had the highest topic proportions in this category. The pie chart to the right of each piece identifies the specific topic proportion for "[unclear] in the piece." You can view the complete topic proportion breakdown for an individual piece by clicking on the title. The handle slider handle on the bottom left of the chart can be adjusted to view articles and advertisements best exemplifying this topic for particular months.