Topic Proportions

Topic Percent
military campaigns
52.2%
[unclear]
8.81%
secession
6.29%
accidents, particularly fires
3.77%
anti-northern diatribes
3.14%
military recruitment
2.52%
Confederate states
1.89%
poetry and patriotism
1.89%
war reports
1.89%
European news
1.89%
war prisoners
1.26%
North
1.26%
maritime news, esp. naval and blockade
1.26%
military--often from Western Theater
1.26%
transportation schedules
1.26%
court proceedings
0.63%
clothing ads
0.63%
real estate sales and auctions
0.63%
war bonds
0.63%
legislature
0.63%
deserters
0.63%
weather
0.63%
entertainment and culture
0.63%
ads--medicine, substitutes, wanted, etc.
0.63%
fugitive slave ads
0.63%
hospitals
0.63%
military orders to report
0.63%
casualties
0.63%
for hire and wanted ads
0.63%
religion
0.63%
From the Thu., Dec. 17, 1863 issue

It appears that the losses of Gen. Bragg's army at the battle of Chickamauga, in killed and prisoners, were after all very inconsiderable. The principal loss was in cannon, and of these he did not lose as many as were gained in the previous battle. Grant found it impossible to follow up his victory. He never yet has been able to accomplish that very difficult task of "following up."—In his last achievement he recoiled from the explosion of his own success. His attempt to pursue the retreating army of Bragg was met by a facer which sent him to the right about in double-quick time. Since that admonition he has fallen back, fearing up railroads behind him, possibly in preparation for movements upon other fields.

Under such circumstances, it would not seem difficult to reorganize and restore to more than its former efficiency the army of Gen. Bragg. If all the stragglers and absentees were brought back to their posts, it would be fully able to assume the aggressive and conquer back all it has lost. Who will be its new commander it is impossible to conjecture. But it is reasonable to suppose that the president will place at its head the best military talent of the Confederacy which can be spared from other posts. Lee cannot be relinquished in his present position, especially if the best of the Yankee Generals—Grant—is to be placed in command of the Army of the Potomac. Nor can Beauregard be withdrawn from Charleston so long as danger menaces that city. But there are others whose services could be called into requisition without damage to other interests. In the failure of Grant to follow up his Chickamauga success, a golden oppor tunity is presented for the organization of an army which shall set at defiance any further Federal invasion of Georgia, and carry the war into the enemy's country. But whatever is done should be done quickly. Not a moment of the precious opportunity should be lost.

Gen. Bragg, we trust, will not withdraw his own valuable counsels and services from his old army. Even those who question his efficiency as a Commander in-Chief admit that in the organization and discipline of armies he has no superior. He is a man of rare magnanimity, the most exalted patriotism, and lion-like courage. We trust that, although no longer Commander-in-Chief he will yet strike many a powerful blow for the good cause.