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From the Sat., Aug. 09, 1862 issue

An officer who participated in the affair at Malvern Hill has furnished us with the following particulars with reference to the occupancy of that point by the enemy, and its subsequent recovery by our forces under Gen. Longstreet:

On Tuesday morning the 8th Georgia regiment Captain Dawson commanding, was moved up from New Market Heights to relieve the 17th, then on picket at Malvern Hill. On the march they were met by several couriers, stating that the enemy were in large force advancing upon the hill and in its immediate vicinity. The reports of artillery gave evidence that a brisk engagement was going on. When the 8th Georgia reached the base of the hill the announcement was made by several couriers to Capt. Dawson, that the ammunition of our pieces was exhausted, and that the artillery at the and the 17th, were surrounded, Capt. D. immediately dispatched a courier to the commandant of the 17th, that he had formed his regiment in line of battle at the base of the hill, and would protect their retreat and to come off at all hazards. With artillery playing upon one flank and a cavalry charge upon the other, they left the hill, and succeeded in making good their retreat, bringing off all their pieces, and only losing one caisson that was tern to pieces in the fight. Some eight or nine of the 17th had previously been captured while picketing.

Three members of the artillery were killed and two wounded. Between 70 and 80 of the enemy are supposed to have been killed. About one mile from the of the hill, the 8th Georgia was over taken by the enemy's cavalry and artillery. So soon as it was discovered, the regiment was drawn up in line of battle, which checked the advance of the foe. The regiment then moved back into a corn-field, and under cover of the corn and intervening hills the retreat was effected with the loss of one man of the regiment, who was captured. The regiment continued to fell back till it came within a short distance of New Market heights. About 3 o'clock the same regiment received orders to advance again through a thick woods on the left of the river road, with a view to feel the enemy. They advanced about two miles, when their skirmishers were fired upon by the enemy, simultaneously with a charge of the enemy's cavalry upon our cavalry. Our cavalry fell back, but the regiment continued to respond to the fire of the enemy for some ten minutes when the firing ceased. Falling back, the cavalry and infantry took position at an eligible position about 400 yards in rear of the woods. The enemy made no further demonstration on that day having full possession of the hill.

On Wednesday morning at daylight the corps of Gen Longstreet was moved forward, and encamped night within half a mile of the hill, the day having been spent in reconnoitering. On Thursday, about 12 o'clock, the corps advanced and took possession of the hill without firing a gun, the enemy having the night before, about 12 The number of the enemy was estimated at from 15,000 to 30,000. Several prisoners were taken, among them two who were on the top of the house on the summit of the hill. Considerable supplies of coffee, mast, crackers, &c, were left by the enemy, indicating that they had under evident alarm.