Topic Proportions

Topic Percent
[unclear]
48%
humor
12%
anti-northern diatribes
9%
military orders, e.g. conscriptions
7%
second-hand news
5%
poetry and patriotism
5%
weather
3%
hospitals
2%
entertainment and culture
2%
court proceedings
1%
clothing ads
1%
North
1%
maritime news, esp. naval and blockade
1%
government
1%
ads--medicine, substitutes, wanted, etc.
1%
religion
1%
From the Mon., Jun. 16, 1862 issue

—There is nothing more difficult to attain, or necessary to possess, than perfect good breeding, which is equally inconsistent with a stiff formality, an impertinent forwardness, and awkward bashfulness. A little ceremony is sometimes necessary; a certain degree of firmness is absolutely so, end an awkward modesty is extremely unbecoming. In mixed companies, whoever is admitted to take part in them, is, for the time at least, supposed to be upon a footing of equality with the rest, and, consequently, every one claims, and very justly, every mark of civility and good breeding.—None is allowed, but carelessness and negligence are strictly forbidden. There is nothing so little forgiven as a seeming in attention to the person who is a making to you. We have seen many people, who, while you are speaking to them, instead of looking at and attending to you, fix their eyes upon the ceiling or some other part of the room, look out at the window, lift a book or newspaper, and read it. Nothing discovers a little,, frivolous mind more than this, and nothing is so offensively ill- bred. Be assured that the profoundest learning, without breading, is unwelcome and tiresome . A man who is not well-bred isn't fit for good society, and is unwelcome in it. Make then, good breeding the great object of your thoughts and actions. Observe carefully the behavior and manner of those who are distinguished by their good breeding. endeavor to excel, that you may at least equal them. —Observe how it adorns merit, and how often it covers the want of it.