Topic Proportions

Topic Percent
secession
65.36%
North
5.59%
government
5.03%
legislature
3.35%
military--often from Western Theater
2.79%
poetry and patriotism
2.23%
military campaigns
1.68%
trade
1.68%
accidents, particularly fires
1.68%
court proceedings
1.12%
military orders, e.g. conscriptions
1.12%
second-hand news
1.12%
European news
1.12%
military recruitment
1.12%
anti-northern diatribes
1.12%
religion
0.56%
[unclear]
0.56%
war reports
0.56%
weather
0.56%
elections
0.56%
articles that list people, esp. marriage notices
0.56%
Confederate states
0.56%
From the Mon., Sep. 09, 1861 issue

—Great excitement existed in Syracuse, New York, on the 5th inst., in consequence of the assembling of the State Democratic Convention. The Tammany delegates were alone admitted, thus excluding the Mozart or "Peace" wing of the party. A telegram from Syracuse says:

The Committee on Resolutions reported a series of resolutions setting forth that the watchword of Democracy was:

"The Union must be preserved." That the claim to relinquish State allegiance was unwarranted by the Constitution, and at war with its letter and spirit; that secession is revolution: that the seizure by the seceding States of the forts and property of the Government, followed by privateering, precipitated the country into the present war; that it is the duty of the Government to prosecute the war with all its power and resources; and that it is the duty of the people to rally to its support, until the struggle ends with the triumph of the Constitution and the restoration of the Union; that we hold next in guilt to the faction in arms the Northern agitators; that it was the duty of Congress to encourage loyal citizens South, by ample guarantees of just and honorable concessions; that it is the duty of the Government, while putting down rebellion, to offer to the loyal people in the disaffected States a convention of all the States, for a revision and amendment of the Constitution; that the Democracy of this State regard any attempt to pervert this conflict into a war for the emancipation of slaves, as fatal to all hopes of the restoration of the Union; that we protest against the doctrine that any power except the representatives of the people can suspend the writ of habeas corpus.

The resolutions also protest against the passport system, and against Government establishing State police; against the assumption of the Government to repress the dissemination of a free press, by the refusal of mail facilities; and finally against the President's doctrine, that the States derive their authority from the Federal Government.

The last resolution concludes thus:—"That a Democratic victory in this State would be hardly less auspicious than a triumph of the Federal arms in the field, and therefore we hold those trying to create dissension in the ranks of the Democracy, not only treasonable to its principles, but disloyal to the country.

A number of speeches were made opposing any peace propositions, except at the cannon's mouth, but guaranteeing to the South all their constitutional rights. The resolutions were mainly adopted.