Topic Proportions

Topic Percent
secession
77.68%
[unclear]
4.46%
poetry and patriotism
3.57%
legislature
2.68%
North
2.68%
clothing ads
0.89%
military campaigns
0.89%
war reports
0.89%
deserters
0.89%
anti-northern diatribes
0.89%
military--often from Western Theater
0.89%
elections
0.89%
military orders to report
0.89%
military recruitment
0.89%
Confederate states
0.89%
From the Mon., Feb. 18, 1861 issue

The constitutional expounder of Springfield has utterly dissipated, with a single breath, every idea of State sovereignty ever entertained North or South; and he means plainly to follow up his views by forcible arguments to show that he is right. He, beyond all doubt, reflects the general opinion of the Northern people, who, having the POWER, are utterly unwilling to make any concession of constitutional right to the States which would limit the exercise of that power to the full extent of compelling submission everywhere to the Federal Government. Notwithstanding that some of the Northern States, in adopting the Constitution, protested strongly that in doing so they did not surrender their sovereignty, and did not assent to it on the principle of unlimited submission, they all now stand up to the view that the Union is a consolidation of power, and the States are united upon the principle of obedience, voluntary or compulsory, to the laws of Congress. All that have nullified those laws declare that everybody else must submit.

Mr. Lincoln, reflecting Northern sentiment, then, declares that State-Rights are simply nothing—that there is nothing sacred in the idea of a State—and he means to make all submit to the laws. In twenty days we may expect stirring times. Lincoln orders the retaking of the forts and the collection of revenue in the seceded States. War follows? Virginia, in her Legislature, has almost unanimously resolved that she will resist coercion of any Southern State. Will she be true to her resolution?