maritime news, esp. naval and blockade

Topic modeling identifies topics, and it also provides a proportional breakdown of the often multiple topics that each individual article or advertisement addressed. This chart shows the changing percentage of print space for this topic in the paper as a whole—for each month the topic proportions for "maritime news, esp. naval and blockade" in all articles containing that topic are added together and then divided by the total number of pieces published that month to calculate a percentage value.

You can also adjust the articles that the above chart takes into account. By default, articles and advertisements that have only a small proportion of their content in this category are included in the chart. Each individual article has a negligible effect, but small proportions in dozens or hundred of articles can add up. Use the controls below the chart to adjust the threshold of the articles charted. You can also choose to chart the summation of the topic proportion of all articles (which makes sense for a topic that's more of a theme) or you can choose to chart the raw count of all articles above your specified threshold (which might be preferable when looking at a topic that's more generic in nature). For the latter kind of chart, you'll likely want to adjust the threshold to something like 20% or 30%.

Adjust Chart

Predictive Words

FORT STEAMER GUNS ISLAND VESSELS FLAG NAVY POINT BOARD FLEET SHIP VESSEL BOAT CAPTAIN PORT BATTERIES IRON BOATS MEN RIVER SUMTER BATTERY GUN FIRE

This list of words are those that the topic model identifies as most likely to appear in documents in this category.

Exemplary Articles

article
84%
1
Monday, August 17, 1863

From Charleston.

Charleston, Aug. 14.

—The bombardment for the last two nights has been incessant and spirited. Two monitors and one of the Yankee batteries on Morris's Island were firing at Port Sumter yesterday at 4,000 yards distance.

There are signs that another terrible bombardment will speedily begin. The Ironsides, . . . more

From Charleston.

Charleston, Aug. 14.

—The bombardment for the last two nights has been incessant and spirited. Two monitors and one of the Yankee batteries on Morris's Island were firing at Port Sumter yesterday at 4,000 yards distance.

There are signs that another terrible bombardment will speedily begin. The Ironsides, with six monitors and five gunboats are inside the bar, and twenty transports are in sight.

A French war steamer is anchored off Fort Sumter. All quiet this morning.

article
80%
2
Thursday, May 30, 1861

The Lighthouse, at Cape Henry, has been dismantled, as reported.

article
78%
3
Friday, October 02, 1863

From Charleston.

Charleston, October 1.

—The enemy fired two hundred pounder Parrotts all day yesterday, at intervals of fifteen minutes, alternately at Forts Sumter and Johnson, and Battery Simpkins. Fort Moultrie and Battery Simpkins replied vigorously. No casualties or damage of any consequence on our side. Very heavy firing . . . more

From Charleston.

Charleston, October 1.

—The enemy fired two hundred pounder Parrotts all day yesterday, at intervals of fifteen minutes, alternately at Forts Sumter and Johnson, and Battery Simpkins. Fort Moultrie and Battery Simpkins replied vigorously. No casualties or damage of any consequence on our side. Very heavy firing is going on between the hostile batteries this morning.

[SECOND DISPATCH]

Charleston, Oct. 1.

—The firing during to-day has been heavier than for several weeks past. The enemy has been steadily pounding at the ruins of Sumter from his old batteries on Morris Island beyond Wagner. His fire was chiefly at Sumter, but he also shelled Fort Johnson. Our batteries and Fort Moultrie replied with brisk and steady fire. All quiet to night.

article
78%
4
Saturday, January 30, 1864

FROM CHARLESTON.

Charleston, Jan. 29

—The enemy, at 9 o'clock last night, reopened fire on Sumter with three 10 inch Columbiads and one 30 pounder Parrott. The fire is directed at the south end of the fort. During the night 100 shells were thrown, 83 of which burst in . . . more

FROM CHARLESTON.

Charleston, Jan. 29

—The enemy, at 9 o'clock last night, reopened fire on Sumter with three 10 inch Columbiads and one 30 pounder Parrott. The fire is directed at the south end of the fort. During the night 100 shells were thrown, 83 of which burst in and over the fort; two Parrott shots also struck the fort. Firing on Sumter continued all day, and is still going on this evening.—No casualties and no damage to the fort. No shelling to day since last report.

article
78%
5
Friday, November 20, 1863

FROM CHARLESTON.

Charleston, Nov. 19.

—The enemy have been firing slowly from Battery Gregg upon Fort Sumter to-day. 'Nothing else new this morning.'

[SECOND DISPATCH.]

Charleston, Nov. 19

—The enemy fired eleven shots from Gregg at the city to-day between 11 A. M. and 1 P. M. Damage trifling. Some . . . more

FROM CHARLESTON.

Charleston, Nov. 19.

—The enemy have been firing slowly from Battery Gregg upon Fort Sumter to-day. 'Nothing else new this morning.'

[SECOND DISPATCH.]

Charleston, Nov. 19

—The enemy fired eleven shots from Gregg at the city to-day between 11 A. M. and 1 P. M. Damage trifling. Some three or four buildings were struck and one person slightly injured.

The Pawnee and another gunboat came up the Stono and shelled battery Pringle, but effected nothing. Firing on Sumter slow and steady all day. Some few shots have been fired at Sullivan's Island batteries. No casualties at Fort Sumter or Sullivan's Island.

article
77%
6
Tuesday, September 10, 1861

From Fortress Monroe.

Fortress Monroe, Sept. 8.

—The steamer Roanoke is here, having been relieved from her position off Charleston by the Wabash.

The Quaker City is here, coaling for a cruise.

article
76%
7
Tuesday, October 27, 1863

FROM CHARLESTON.

Charleston, Oct. 26.

—There has been no firing this morning. Everything is quiet.

[SECOND DISPATCH.]

Charleston, Oct. 26.

—The enemy's batteries at Gregg and Wagner opened fire at 11 o'clock this morning with seven guns from the former and four from the latter. The fire was principally directed . . . more

FROM CHARLESTON.

Charleston, Oct. 26.

—There has been no firing this morning. Everything is quiet.

[SECOND DISPATCH.]

Charleston, Oct. 26.

—The enemy's batteries at Gregg and Wagner opened fire at 11 o'clock this morning with seven guns from the former and four from the latter. The fire was principally directed against Sumter and Fort Johnson. Two monitors were also engaged. The firing ceased at dark. One hundred shots were thrown from Morris Island, and one hundred and sixty-five from the monitors. We fired from Moultrie. No damage yet. Our batteries replied vigorously.

article
76%
8
Tuesday, September 03, 1861

From Fortress Monroe.

Fortress Monroe, Aug. 31.

—The gunboat Iroquois has arrived from the blockade off Savannah. She reported hearing heavy cannonading off Hatteras.

A Confederate tug has arrived off here. She is armed with rifle cannon, and fired several shots at the Savannah. "Nobody hurt."—The tug retired behind Old . . . more

From Fortress Monroe.

Fortress Monroe, Aug. 31.

—The gunboat Iroquois has arrived from the blockade off Savannah. She reported hearing heavy cannonading off Hatteras.

A Confederate tug has arrived off here. She is armed with rifle cannon, and fired several shots at the Savannah. "Nobody hurt."—The tug retired behind Old Point and fired two shells—one exploded near the Seminole, and the other close to the Rip Raps. She that retired behind Sewell's Point.

[The Confederate tug engaged in the above affair is the "Harmony," as already announced in our Norfolk correspondence.

Eds]

article
75%
9
Monday, January 21, 1861

The Course Of Trade.

—The Savannah Republican, of Saturday, reports the arrival at that port of four ships and one bark, which had been prevented from going into Charleston harbor by the sinking of three vessels in the ship channel by the authorities.

article
75%
10
Friday, April 05, 1861

Sailing of the Harriet Lane.

New York, April 4.

—The Harriet Lane has gone below and anchored off quarantine. She in bound to sea.

In this column are pieces from the Daily Dispatch that best exemplified this topic; i.e. they had the highest topic proportions in this category. The pie chart to the right of each piece identifies the specific topic proportion for "maritime news, esp. naval and blockade in the piece." You can view the complete topic proportion breakdown for an individual piece by clicking on the title. The handle slider handle on the bottom left of the chart can be adjusted to view articles and advertisements best exemplifying this topic for particular months.