military campaigns

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Predictive Words

ARMY GENERAL MEN ENEMY WAR BATTLE MILITARY LEE GREAT FORCE TROOPS THOUSAND MCCLELLAN GRANT VICTORY COUNTRY FIELD ARMIES GENERALS GEN CAMPAIGN SUCCESS SOLDIERS TIME

This list of words are those that the topic model identifies as most likely to appear in documents in this category.

Exemplary Articles

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Friday, March 07, 1862

FROM NORFOLK.



Norfolk March 6, 1862.

It has been said that

A few up it

It is evident beyond

The enemy has

One of our

After

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Thursday, April 25, 1861

Old Point.

There are said to be five thousand men at Old Point.

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Monday, June 15, 1863

The Brandy Station Battle.

The general conclusion from the facts obtained with reference to the recent right on the Rappahannock is that our men very gallantly retrieved the fortunes of the day, which, under the circumstances of a complete surprise by a superior force, would have resulted in a disastrous . . . more

The Brandy Station Battle.

The general conclusion from the facts obtained with reference to the recent right on the Rappahannock is that our men very gallantly retrieved the fortunes of the day, which, under the circumstances of a complete surprise by a superior force, would have resulted in a disastrous defeat to men less brave and determined than they. Our own accounts are sustained by the Yankee dispatches, which show plainly that the enemy does not consider that he achieved anything to boast of. Indeed, he achieved nothing but a repulse.—Stoneman, following the illustrious example of Burnside and Hooker, ended his battle by taking himself back to that side of the river from which he came in the morning.

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Monday, May 19, 1862

From Corinth.

Our latest dates from the army of General Beauregard are to the 15th inst., up to which time nothing decisive or important had occurred. The enemy still tremblingly hesitates to attack the forces which so successfully engaged him at Shiloh, and it is not improbable that weeks may . . . more

From Corinth.

Our latest dates from the army of General Beauregard are to the 15th inst., up to which time nothing decisive or important had occurred. The enemy still tremblingly hesitates to attack the forces which so successfully engaged him at Shiloh, and it is not improbable that weeks may elapse before the forward columns of Halleck's grand army reach the front lines of our Southwestern Let them advance when they may we feel confident they will be hurled back upon their gunboats with a reverse unequalled since the commencement of the war.

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Wednesday, April 13, 1864

The Apprehending Campaign.

The spring campaign on the Potomac is about to open. The hopes of our army are buoyant, its spirit high, its courage undaunted, its condition admirable. Every man depends upon himself, has confidence in his officers, and knows that he will be sustained by his comrades. They . . . more

The Apprehending Campaign.

The spring campaign on the Potomac is about to open. The hopes of our army are buoyant, its spirit high, its courage undaunted, its condition admirable. Every man depends upon himself, has confidence in his officers, and knows that he will be sustained by his comrades. They have a General who has never sustained a defeat, and an enemy whom they have never met but to conquer. They are one and all, officers and men, impressed with the belief that the Yankees are about to make their final effort, and that if they fall they will no longer have anything more to fear from them. They are eager for the commencement of active operations, and impatient of the unavoidable delay.

On the other hand the Yankees will open the campaign with a much smaller comparative force than they have been accustomed to. With all their boasting, and all their lying, we are confident that they will not greatly outnumber Gen. Lee when the hour for action shall have arrived. They cannot add greatly to Grant's force without detracting greatly from the force of some other General, a plain proof that their resources are on the wane, if not already approaching the point of exhaustion. At what point soever of Gen. Lee's line—in front, in flank, or in rear—they may make a demonstration, they will most assuredly be met with forces very nearly equal to their own, and we do not believe it possible for a Yankee force however well commanded and appointed, to beat an equal force of Confederates, let them be appointed and commanded as illy as they may. The chances are therefore vastly in our favor, and there is but one circumstance which renders their chances as good as they were when the campaign of 1863 opened.

That circumstance is the possession of a General superior to any they have ever yet had. That Grant is a man of far more energy and ability than any that has yet commanded the army of the Potomac, cannot be denied. But, then, what sort of men have commanded it? The imbecile McDowell, the lying charlatan McClellan, the low, brutal, boasting poltroon Pope, the murdering coward Burnside, the drunken braggart Hooker, the timid, but gentlemanly Meade. That Grant is a much superior leader to all these, cannot be denied. And yet, it may be denied that he is a great General, since he has never done anything to prove that he is so. Let us see what he has done. We first hear of him at Belmont, where he was signally defeated and driven to his boats by Gen. Polk, and whence get dated a lying bulletin claiming the victory. He next appears before Fort Donelson, where, with eighty full regiments, an enormous fleet, and every advantage that a vast superiority in arms and equipments could give them, he contrived, after a desperate conflict of three days, in which the Confederates were uniformly victorious, to capture the place with 7,000 out of a garrison originally but 11,000 strong, having himself lost fully as many men as were in the fort.—A few weeks after, with forces not more than one-third as strong as his own, he was attacked by Sydney Johnston at Shiloh and routed so completely that, had not that great leader been killed, his whole army would have been destroyed. When reinforced by Buell, and while one-half the Confederate army was dispersed in search of plunder among the tents of the Yankees which they had captured, he attacked Beauregard, and was repulsed in every attempt. With 100,000 men, and the most powerful fleet that had ever been seen upon any river in the world, he captured Vicksburg, after a trial of six months, solely through the incompetence of the commander, who had but 27,000 men, and divided them in such a way as to present on the battle-field but a fourth of fifth of the enemy's force, and who persistently disobeyed every order given him by his superior—Gen. Johnston. At Missionary Ridge, he was enabled to fall on Gen. Bragg with an army three or four times as numerous as his own. Repulsed in the pursuit by General Cleburne, he never afterwards dared to make a movement in front, feeling himself as much overawed in the presence of Gen. Johnston as Anthony was in that of C├Žsar.

Such is the man with whom Gen. Lee has to contend, and such his career. His performances bear no comparison whatever to those of Gen. Lee. He has hitherto succeeded by dint of brute force. He has always had vastly superior numbers when he has been victorious. The man who, with small numbers and weak resources, contrives to perform mighty deeds, is the great General. Such is not Grant, and such is General Lee. The latter has always fought against immense odds, and has always been victorious. Trust, the Yankees tried to claim a victory at Sharpsburg; but the very fact that they were unable to pursue, and that they made no demonstration for three months after, proves that the claim, was false. They claimed a mighty victory, too, at Gettysburg; yet it paralyzed them for nearly a year. Gen. Lee now, for the first time, fights with numbers somewhat on an equality. —Can there be any doubt about the result?—For our part, all we are afraid of is that our troops are too full of confidence.

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Monday, June 30, 1862

The Grand Conflict.

The grand conflict of the immense armies near this city still progresses. Our successes have been almost uninterrupted. The nature of the country and the great extent of the lines prohibited a grand battle in open plain. The struggle has been one of successive fights of divisions . . . more

The Grand Conflict.

The grand conflict of the immense armies near this city still progresses. Our successes have been almost uninterrupted. The nature of the country and the great extent of the lines prohibited a grand battle in open plain. The struggle has been one of successive fights of divisions of the armies thus far. But there must be a greater battle than any yet between the main bodies, when brought by concentration and strategy front to front.

The positions of the armies at this time, it is believed, insures a complete ultimate triumph to our arms. The intrepid Jackson, as our citizens have been aware for several days, is in the field here with his principal force. By a rapid march he swept down from the mountains, and, re-operating with General Lee, got in rear of the enemy. It is understood that he has cut off retreat by way of the Pamunkey, and stands a stone wall to hold the enemy to his position, while he is pressed by our intrepid forces on the South bank of the Chickahominy. He has had some hard fighting, and has dealt the enemy some terrible blows.

The struggle began auspiciously for our arms, and has continued with daily triumphs. We refer to our details. The final blow must be given, we suppose, in a few hours. We are confident of complete victory. Let us be grateful for our signal success the past week, and continue our prayers to Heaven for final triumph.

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Friday, July 10, 1863

The Situation.

We have lost Vicksburg. That no longer admits of a doubt. We have lost Vicksburg, and Grant is rapidly advancing upon Johnston and Jackson, with forces which are represented as irresistibly superior. The latter General will now be compelled to retreat, we presume and as he has heretofore . . . more

The Situation.

We have lost Vicksburg. That no longer admits of a doubt. We have lost Vicksburg, and Grant is rapidly advancing upon Johnston and Jackson, with forces which are represented as irresistibly superior. The latter General will now be compelled to retreat, we presume and as he has heretofore been much celebrated for the masterly character of his retrograde movements, we are induced to hope that he will not, on this occasion, fall below his reputation. The fall of Vicksburg is a heavy blow but it is by no means of such a character as ought to render us despondent. In the eat States of Mississippi and Alabama, now that the people are thoroughly awake to their situation, may be found resources sufficient to cover all that we have lost by the fall of Vicksburg. The Yankees do not open the navigation of the river by their success, and that is the great object, they say for which they have been fighting. Above all, we look to the invincible spirit of the Southwest—that spirit which has borne them up through the disasters of three campaigns—for the materials of resistance and of ultimate triumph. A people determined never to be conquered cannot be conquered. We shall doubt only when we the people begin to falter.

With regard to General Lee, when the read shall have glanced over the very interesting intelligence obtained from a wounded officer, which he will find in another column, he will at once dismiss all apprehensions. The Yankee accounts which we publish to day are a tissue of lies and exaggeration from beginning to end. Gen. Lee is perfectly master of the situation, and of his own movements. Apparently he has no idea of leaving. Maryland. Victorious in two days of the battles, he failed but in one instance to rent the enemy, and then he fell back in perfect order, induced to do so by want of provisions along. The people of the Confederacy may place, as heretofore, the most implied confidence in him. Wherever he is there they may be assures everything will be done that should be.

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Wednesday, August 06, 1862

FROM THE ENGLISH PRESS.
GAUSE OF THE ENGLISH ATTACKS ON M'CLELLAN.

[From the London Herald, (Derby organ,) July 15.]

It is no longer possible to doubt that McClellan's army has sustained a decisive defeat. Whatever lingering faith in the Army of the Potomac may have been kept alive by the ambiguous wording . . . more

FROM THE ENGLISH PRESS.
GAUSE OF THE ENGLISH ATTACKS ON M'CLELLAN.

[From the London Herald, (Derby organ,) July 15.]

It is no longer possible to doubt that McClellan's army has sustained a decisive defeat. Whatever lingering faith in the Army of the Potomac may have been kept alive by the ambiguous wording of New York telegrams, there is now no chance of concealing the misfortune that has befallen the Northern invader, or of sustaining the fiction of Northern invincibility. The second campaign closes as did the first, with disaster and humiliation to the Federal arms. * * * * *

Gen. McClellan commanded. Young and active, a great strategist on paper, a severe critic of our Crimean blunders, with unlimited powers at his back, and the unstinted confidence of the whole of the North to support him, his army saluted him as if with the sure presentment of victory, the Northern press could find no parallel for him save in the greatest soldier of modern days, and christened him the "Young Napoleon." But we venture to say that no General, either of ancient or modern times, ever achieved such small results with the magnificent material entrusted to him.—For months a few mud embankments and "quaker" guns served to keep Washington in terror, and when the order for advance was given, the grand army of the Potomac found the lines of Manassas deserted. McClellan's plans were upset. The Confederates were disobliging enough to insist upon choosing their own ground for fighting, and the Young Napoleon was nonplussed. But Richmond was to be taken somehow, and the point of attack was changed. Suddenly the great army was broken up, and the bulk of it transported to Yorktown peninsula. Those who knew their man at once declared the Young Napoleon's chances gone. There was some hope in the inert strength of his undivided force; very little in his own military skill. The events of the campaign in the Yorktown peninsula have removed all doubts about his claim to be considered a great commander. At Yorktown the Confederates retired, because it did not suit them to fight at a disadvantage. At Williamsburg he lost guns and prisoners, and publicly attributed the success he claimed to the valor of one brigade. At West Point more guns and more prisoners were lost, and again a timely brigade saved the honor of the army. At Fair Oaks a division was cut to pieces, its guns, camp and material captured, and now, from being the assailant, McClellan's army, or all that remains of it, is shut up between the Chickahominy and the James rivers, indebted to the protection of gunboats for escape from destruction or surrender. In one particular only has McClellan succeeded in resembling his great master—he has written excellent parodies of his dispatches.

[From the London Times, July 12.]

At the present it cannot be said that there is any probability of the reduction of Richmond. The Confederates, by using all the strength and rousing all the enthusiasm of the country, have brought together armies in Virginia with which the Federals find it impossible to cope. It is impossible to refuse admiration to a people which, invaded by a community three times as numerous as itself, and deprived of military supplies from foreign countries, is yet able not only to oppose a stubborn resistance to its enemies, but to take the offensive, and inflict on them the most severe defeats. The present situation of the two armies is likely to give the greatest encouragement to the South, and to raise to the highest pitch the resolution and the military pride of its people. They have defeated the Northern men in every battle of the war in which naval strength did not enter, and now the main army of the enemy is driven back and shut up in a narrow peninsula, where its communications are endangered and its power of doing harm to the Confederates is almost destroyed.—What must be the result of such a battle as has just been fought? Evidently that the Federals will have again to begin the siege of Richmond, with much worse chances than at first. A beaten army, which loses daily large numbers from fever and other maladies, encamped on a desert tract of land, debarred from all communication with the country beyond them, and the enemy's cavalry ever ready to take advantage of any weakness in their communications with the sea behind them, is not likely to gain any very important advantages in the midst of an American summer.

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Thursday, December 17, 1863

Gen. Bragg's Army.

It appears that the losses of Gen. Bragg's army at the battle of Chickamauga, in killed and prisoners, were after all very inconsiderable. The principal loss was in cannon, and of these he did not lose as many as were gained in the previous battle. Grant found . . . more

Gen. Bragg's Army.

It appears that the losses of Gen. Bragg's army at the battle of Chickamauga, in killed and prisoners, were after all very inconsiderable. The principal loss was in cannon, and of these he did not lose as many as were gained in the previous battle. Grant found it impossible to follow up his victory. He never yet has been able to accomplish that very difficult task of "following up."—In his last achievement he recoiled from the explosion of his own success. His attempt to pursue the retreating army of Bragg was met by a facer which sent him to the right about in double-quick time. Since that admonition he has fallen back, fearing up railroads behind him, possibly in preparation for movements upon other fields.

Under such circumstances, it would not seem difficult to reorganize and restore to more than its former efficiency the army of Gen. Bragg. If all the stragglers and absentees were brought back to their posts, it would be fully able to assume the aggressive and conquer back all it has lost. Who will be its new commander it is impossible to conjecture. But it is reasonable to suppose that the president will place at its head the best military talent of the Confederacy which can be spared from other posts. Lee cannot be relinquished in his present position, especially if the best of the Yankee Generals—Grant—is to be placed in command of the Army of the Potomac. Nor can Beauregard be withdrawn from Charleston so long as danger menaces that city. But there are others whose services could be called into requisition without damage to other interests. In the failure of Grant to follow up his Chickamauga success, a golden oppor tunity is presented for the organization of an army which shall set at defiance any further Federal invasion of Georgia, and carry the war into the enemy's country. But whatever is done should be done quickly. Not a moment of the precious opportunity should be lost.

Gen. Bragg, we trust, will not withdraw his own valuable counsels and services from his old army. Even those who question his efficiency as a Commander in-Chief admit that in the organization and discipline of armies he has no superior. He is a man of rare magnanimity, the most exalted patriotism, and lion-like courage. We trust that, although no longer Commander-in-Chief he will yet strike many a powerful blow for the good cause.

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Wednesday, September 30, 1863

From Northern Virginia.

—The accounts which reach us from the Rapidan leave little doubt that the enemy's force in that quarter has been greatly reduced in the past few days by the withdrawal of troops for their army in the Southwest, in consequence of which their forces under . . . more

From Northern Virginia.

—The accounts which reach us from the Rapidan leave little doubt that the enemy's force in that quarter has been greatly reduced in the past few days by the withdrawal of troops for their army in the Southwest, in consequence of which their forces under Gen. Meade are falling back.

From passengers who came down yesterday afternoon by the Central train we are assured that the army of Gen. Lee was never in better condition, and the spirits of the men, under the influence of the encouraging news of the victory in Northern Georgia, was never more buoyant. They long for an opportunity to again measure strength with the invader.

In this column are pieces from the Daily Dispatch that best exemplified this topic; i.e. they had the highest topic proportions in this category. The pie chart to the right of each piece identifies the specific topic proportion for "military campaigns in the piece." You can view the complete topic proportion breakdown for an individual piece by clicking on the title. The handle slider handle on the bottom left of the chart can be adjusted to view articles and advertisements best exemplifying this topic for particular months.