war reports

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Predictive Words

ENEMY WOUNDED KILLED GEN LEFT BATTLE MEN FIGHT LOSS LINE BACK ARTILLERY POSITION FORCE CAVALRY MILES FRONT ROAD BRIGADE TROOPS DAY SIDE MORNING NIGHT

This list of words are those that the topic model identifies as most likely to appear in documents in this category.

Exemplary Articles

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Tuesday, July 14, 1863

Gen Edward Johnson.

It was not this officer who was wounded in the battle of Gettysburg. He was not burt.

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Saturday, August 09, 1862

THE AFFAIR AT MALVERN HILL.

An officer who participated in the affair at Malvern Hill has furnished us with the following particulars with reference to the occupancy of that point by the enemy, and its subsequent recovery by our forces under Gen. Longstreet:

On Tuesday morning the 8th Georgia regiment Captain . . . more

THE AFFAIR AT MALVERN HILL.

An officer who participated in the affair at Malvern Hill has furnished us with the following particulars with reference to the occupancy of that point by the enemy, and its subsequent recovery by our forces under Gen. Longstreet:

On Tuesday morning the 8th Georgia regiment Captain Dawson commanding, was moved up from New Market Heights to relieve the 17th, then on picket at Malvern Hill. On the march they were met by several couriers, stating that the enemy were in large force advancing upon the hill and in its immediate vicinity. The reports of artillery gave evidence that a brisk engagement was going on. When the 8th Georgia reached the base of the hill the announcement was made by several couriers to Capt. Dawson, that the ammunition of our pieces was exhausted, and that the artillery at the and the 17th, were surrounded, Capt. D. immediately dispatched a courier to the commandant of the 17th, that he had formed his regiment in line of battle at the base of the hill, and would protect their retreat and to come off at all hazards. With artillery playing upon one flank and a cavalry charge upon the other, they left the hill, and succeeded in making good their retreat, bringing off all their pieces, and only losing one caisson that was tern to pieces in the fight. Some eight or nine of the 17th had previously been captured while picketing.

Three members of the artillery were killed and two wounded. Between 70 and 80 of the enemy are supposed to have been killed. About one mile from the of the hill, the 8th Georgia was over taken by the enemy's cavalry and artillery. So soon as it was discovered, the regiment was drawn up in line of battle, which checked the advance of the foe. The regiment then moved back into a corn-field, and under cover of the corn and intervening hills the retreat was effected with the loss of one man of the regiment, who was captured. The regiment continued to fell back till it came within a short distance of New Market heights. About 3 o'clock the same regiment received orders to advance again through a thick woods on the left of the river road, with a view to feel the enemy. They advanced about two miles, when their skirmishers were fired upon by the enemy, simultaneously with a charge of the enemy's cavalry upon our cavalry. Our cavalry fell back, but the regiment continued to respond to the fire of the enemy for some ten minutes when the firing ceased. Falling back, the cavalry and infantry took position at an eligible position about 400 yards in rear of the woods. The enemy made no further demonstration on that day having full possession of the hill.

On Wednesday morning at daylight the corps of Gen Longstreet was moved forward, and encamped night within half a mile of the hill, the day having been spent in reconnoitering. On Thursday, about 12 o'clock, the corps advanced and took possession of the hill without firing a gun, the enemy having the night before, about 12 The number of the enemy was estimated at from 15,000 to 30,000. Several prisoners were taken, among them two who were on the top of the house on the summit of the hill. Considerable supplies of coffee, mast, crackers, &c, were left by the enemy, indicating that they had under evident alarm.

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Friday, December 05, 1862

THE FIGHT AT LAVERGNE, TENN.

Through the politeness of a gentleman who participated in the affair, we are enabled to present to surrenders an accurate, though not a very long, account of the heavy skirmish at Lavergne, Tenn., on the 28th of November. It might rather be called an artillery . . . more

THE FIGHT AT LAVERGNE, TENN.

Through the politeness of a gentleman who participated in the affair, we are enabled to present to surrenders an accurate, though not a very long, account of the heavy skirmish at Lavergne, Tenn., on the 28th of November. It might rather be called an artillery duel, for the severest part of the engagement was between the artillery on other side. The forces engaged were the advance of the opposing armies. General Wheeler, with his brigade, was posted at Lavergne, fifteen miles beyond Murfreesboro', and here the enemy made the attack with a much larger force consisting of cavalry and artillery. The fight soon became severe, and the discharges of cannon were rapid and incessant. Both sides seemed determined to drive the other off the field, or at least not to yield an inch of the disputed territory, and for some hours our troops fight with the most desperate bravery. At length however, it became evident that it was useless to contend longer against a superior force, not say in numbers, but in guns, and General Wheeler slowly withdrew his command to a point four miles distant. Fortunately he was here reinforced, and rallying his men, drove the enemy back and to gained the ground he had lost. It was near the nose of the fight when General Wheeler's horse was killed by a shell, and he himself was wounded in the leg. But for this circumstance, and the lateness of the hour, the Abolition force would have been totally routed. As it was, they lost nearly two hundred in killed and wounded, while our casualties are less than half that number.

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Monday, February 22, 1864

THE PENNSYLVANIA CAMPAIGN.

[FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.]
Army of Northern Virginia, Feb. 18th, 1864.

My last letter brought up the events of the Pennsylvania campaign to the battle of Winchester To day I propose to speak of

THE PASSAGE OF THE POTOMAC AND THE FIRST DAY'S FIGHT AT GETTYSBURG.

It may be proper . . . more

THE PENNSYLVANIA CAMPAIGN.

[FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.]
Army of Northern Virginia, Feb. 18th, 1864.

My last letter brought up the events of the Pennsylvania campaign to the battle of Winchester To day I propose to speak of

THE PASSAGE OF THE POTOMAC AND THE FIRST DAY'S FIGHT AT GETTYSBURG.

It may be proper here to say that I shall necessarily have to treat of the movements and doings of the troops engaged by corps.

Ewell's Corps.—Rodes crossed the Potomac on the 15th and 16th at Williamsport. Johnson crossed the river on the 18th at Shepherdstown. Early did not cross until two day's inter, owing to high water. On the 20th Rodes and Johnson moved through Hagerstown to Greencastle, and Early crossed the river and moved to Cavetown; and so the invasion of Pennsylvania had begun.

On the 24th the whole of A. P. Hill's corps crossed the Potomac at Shepherdstown, that of Longstreet having previously reached the Maryland shore by the Williamsport ford—the corps of Gen. Longstreet being composed of the divisions of McLaws, Pickett, and Hood; whilst that of Hill consisted of Pender, Heth, and Anderson. The troops were all well clad and in fine spirits; eager, and ready to meet the foe.

Having thus rapidly opposed of the different corps up to the time of their crossing the Potomac, I will now speak of the movements and operations of each separately, as more likely to prove satisfactory to the general reader, as well as for an intelligent understanding of the whole subject as for a just appreciation of the achievements of each department of the army.

Rodes's and Johnson's divisions of Ewell's corps marched on the same road to Shippensburg. From Shippensburg they moved by two parallel roads to Carlisle, which they reached on the evening of the 25th of June. On the 29th Brig.-Gen. Jenkins and command, accompanied by Capt. Richardson Gen. Ewell's Engineer, went within sight and artillery range of Harrisburg, Pa., and reconnoitered the defences of the city, with the view on the part of Gen Ewell of attacking the place the next day with his whole corps. The next day, as Gen. Ewell was preparing to march to Harrisburg, twenty miles distant, an order came to him to unite his corps with the rest of the army at Cashtown, near Gettysburg. Major Gen. Early, of this corps, who, after crossing the river, had moved to York, and who was then at that place, was at once notified, and the corps immediately took up the line of march. Johnson, who had encamped two or three miles from Carlisle, moved back, accompanied by the reserve artillery of the corps, under Col. J. Thompson Brown, towards Chambersburg; whilst Rodes moved via Papertown and Petersburg to Heidiersburg, five miles from Gettysburg. Early camped at night near Berlin. That night Gen. R. S. Ewell communicated with Gen. A. P Hill, who was at Cashtown Early next morning Gen. Ewell set his division in motion to join Gen. Hill, he himself going in motion to join Gen. Hill, he himself going in front with Rodes's division. At Middletown Gen. E. received word from Gen. Hill that he was advancing towards Gettysburg, where one corps of the enemy was reported to have arrived. Early was at the same time ordered to move towards the town direct from Heidiersburg. Johnson had encamped the night before at near Scotland, and would have made the junction with the rest of the corps at Cashtown by noon or a little thereafter.

When Rodes's division arrived on the battle-field there was nothing going on save some artillery firing. Rodes's division consisted of five brigades, to-wit: Paniel's, Iverson's and Ramseur's North Carolina brigades, Doles's Georgia brigade, and Rodes's (old) Alabama brigade, commanded by Col O'Neill. Carter's battalion of artillery was attached to this command. Rodes came into the engagement on the flank of the enemy, who were confronting A P Bill, and occupied the most commanding point of the very ridge with artillery which the enemy were upon. This ridge runs in the shape of a crescent around Gettysburg, following the windings of a creek which is between it and the town. The Middletown road avoids the ridge by a turn to the left, and a descent into the hollow of the creek. Rodes formed his old brigade and that of Iverson into line on the top of the ridge, and placed Doles to the left, near the Middletown road, and separated some hundreds of yards by a gap from the others. Daniel was in line three hundred yards or more behind Iverson's right, to protect that flank. Ramseur was in reserve, and the 5th Alabama was left to hold the gap between O'Neill and Doles.

After Carter's battalion of artillery had been engaged for some half an hour with admirable effect, the enemy were observed to be moving rapidly from Hill's front to that of Rodes's, and to be advancing their new columns against Rodes from the town. Rodes, his dispositions having been made, advanced his whole line. It had first to cross a field six hundred yards wide and enter woods—immediately upon entering which it became hotly engaged.

The Alabama brigade advanced somewhat confusedly, owing, it is said, to a misconception as to the direction which it should take, and whilst confused became engaged and was forced back, with its lines broken, though reinforced by the 5th Alabama, which uncovered Lawson's brigade. This brigade was at the time spoken of as having behaved badly, owing to a mistake of Gen. J.'s, who reported to Gen. Rodes, in the midst of the fight, that one of his regiments had raised the white flag and gone over in a body to the enemy. The only foundation for this report was that two of his regiments were almost entirely surrounded in consequence of the giving way of the Alabama brigade and the concentration of the enemy at that point, and were all either killed or captured almost to a man. The gallant resistance, however, which they made may be shown by a statement coming from Gen. Rodes himself: that, riding along behind where their line had been, he thought he observed a regiment lying down, as if to escape the Yankee fire. On going up, however, to force them into the fight, he found they were all corpses.

General Daniel, advancing, found himself opposed to a very heavy force of the enemy, which he charged and drove back to a railroad cut running in a diagonal direction across his front and past his right flank. Here he found, directly across the cut, and two hundred and fifty yards to his right and rear, some of Gen. Hill's troops, lying down, while the enemy were firing heavily on his flank and rear; a battery, some four or five hundred yards off, near a barn, being specially troublesome. He sent two messages to the officer commanding these troops, hoping to get him to unite with him, and thus carry the field by a combined attack.—Once this regiment got up and moved some twenty yards to the front and again resumed its recumbent position. Finally Gen. D. had to leave his line, guarded by the 2d N C. battalion and a regiment, under a galling fire from the enemy, and move the other three regiments by the right flank to a point where they could cross the cut and form his line anew for a charge, which was most gallantly executed, the enemy scarcely saving their artillery and making no more stands until they reached Gettysburg.

Just as General D. was preparing for this final charge, Gen. Ramseur's brigade and the third Alabama regiment, which by some mistake had been separated from the rest of the brigade (Rodes's,) at the moment of advance, and so had not participated in the repulse which that brigade sustained, advanced to hold the line of Iverson's and O'Neill's brigades. The remnant of Iverson's old brigade formed on the right of Ramseur under Capt. D. P. Halsey, A. A. G. of the brigade, whose gallantry and good conduct were quite remarkable, and who assumed command of the brigade when reformed. The Alabama brigade also rallied and advanced. Ramseur made a most gallant charge, with his usual impetuosity and daring, and, being bravely seconded by the whole line, the enemy were driven back towards and into the town. Doles, advancing parallel with Iverson and O'Neill but with a gap of five or six hundred yards intervening, came up with a column of the enemy twice his own, which was advancing out from the town. This column marched rapidly past his right flank, endeavoring to get into the gap between him and O'Neill. This movement was quickly frustrated by a change of front, which was rapidly executed by the right wing of Doles, who first fired a volley and then charged, breaking the whole Yankee column and driving it towards the town. Doles started in pursuit, but was checked by the appearance of large columns, nearly a whole corps, moving out parallel with the Heidiersburg road from Gettysburg. This last column would have forced him to have fallen back but for the timely arrival of Early by the Heidiersburg road. Gen. E. at once put his artillery into position on the left of that road and opened fire, enfilading and silencing batteries which were then occupied in an attempt to enfilade Rodes's artillery, and in truth these batteries of the enemy were doing us a good deal of damage. Gordon's and Hoke's brigades were formed on the right of the Heidiersburg road. A space was left between them for Hays's brigade, which had been kept in rear of the division wagon train as a guard, but which came up in time to take part in the advance which was soon made—Smith's brigade being left to support the artillery.

Just as the enemy were out-flanking Doles, Gordon's brigade started forward to charge the enemy. And magnificently and nobly did he and his Georgia braves go to their appointed work. They cross a small stream and valley and enter a long, narrow strip of an opposite slope, at the top of which the enemy had a strong force posted. For five minutes nothing could be heard or seen save the smoke and roar proceeding from the heavy musketry, and indicating a desperate contest; but the contest was not long or uncertain. The Yankees are put to flight and our men press them, pouring a deadly fire at these flying fugitives. A group of officers gathering around a white flag with a red centre, the badge of one of their corps, were vainly endeavoring to rally their men, when a shot from one of Col Jones's guns killed two or three of them and the rest quickly scattered. Seeing a second and larger line near the town, Gen. Early haited Gen. G until Gens. Hayes and Hoke could come up, when a second charge was made, and three pieces of artillery, besides several entire regiments of the enemy, were captured. Gen. Daniel, on the extreme right of our corps, and Hoke's brigade, under Col. Avery, on the extreme left, reached the town simultaneously.—Doles came in near about the same time in the centre. Daniel did not enter quite so soon, as the enemy had so far outstripped him that he halted to form. Doles and Early coming in on the flank of the enemy, retreating from Daniel, caught quite a number of prisoners in the town. Indeed, of the 6,000 or 7,000 taken in the town of Gettysburg, about 4,000 were captured on the evening of the 1st of July by Rodes's and Early's divisions, this number being about equally divided between them.

The fight now being over, or rather the enemy having retreated through the town, Gen. Ewell rode into town, and, meeting with Gen. Early, they together made a reconnaissance, in which it was discovered that the enemy were in considerably larger force than our own, and were posted on the heights (the "Cemetery" bill now so famous,) beyond the town. Here they had formed a line of battle which overlapped Ewell's on both flanks, (for Gen. Hill had not then entered the town,) and had already opened from several batteries on Ewell's troops in and beyond the town. Inasmuch as we could not get a single piece of artillery to bear on them effectively, and the additional fact that but one half hour of daylight remained, and it being more than probable that it would take longer than this to carry their new position, Gen. Ewell determined not to push the attack that evening, but to wait until next morning to renew the fight. Gen. Johnson's division and the reserve artillery had gotten up just after Gens-Ewell and Rodes had entered the town, and were sent to the extreme left to occupy a high wooded hill commanding the "Cemetery Hill" and then unoccupied. By the time, however, that General J. reached the foot of the hill, the enemy had occupied it, (with one corps, as Meade's official report will show) so that he was unable to seize it. The enemy worked incessantly during the night in felling abattis and throwing up fortifications.

Early now occupied the town with three brigades—Hay's, Gordon's and Hoke's—Smith being left as a reserve to provide against any flank or rear movement—his right resting on the main street and his left just outside of the edge of the town, fronting "Cemetery Hill." Rodes's right rested about four hundred yards outside of the suburbs of the town, his left extending into it along the Fairfield road, near to Early's right; Johnson, having crossed the creek before mentioned, on the line of the York River railroad and pike, had formed his line across the back-bone of a ridge running towards the wooded bill already mentioned, a good deal lower, however, than it or "Cemetery Hill." A gap of half a mile or more was between his right and Early's left.

Rodes bore the brunt of battle on this day. His men acted nobly and suffered severely, especially Daniel's North Carolina brigade. These latter were new men, yet they behaved with unsurpassed gallantry, losing 900 men. Carter's artillery battalion, attached to this division, was hotly engaged for four hours or more, and suffered much from a superior fire of the enemy's artillery. It suffered more than it would otherwise have done, from the fact that the ground it occupied during the greater part of the fight though high and commanding, was quite level, thus affording little or no shelter for guns or caissons.

Early, by his timely arrival, undoubtedly turned the tide of battle in our favor, (for spite of Daniel's success our forces could not have held their ground against the column of the enemy endeavoring to turn Doles's left), yet his loss was not heavy. Gordon's loss was about 400. That of the other two brigades was quite slight. Col. Jones's battalion of artillery also did good service without corresponding loss.

Rodes came into action on the flank of the enemy confronting Gen. Hill—Early in turn on the flank of those opposing Rodes. Thus it happened that many of the Yankees in front of Rodes's a centre and left and of Early's right were caught in a trap by the rapid advance of Early's left wing Among the successes, I should have mentioned that Rodes captured two pieces of artillery during this evening's fight.

Many brave officers and soldiers went down in this evening's engagement, but I cannot name them all. Among them, however, no one was more regretted than Col. Christie, of N. C., who was severely wounded, and who died at Winchester a few days after the fights were over.

This communication is already too long for one day's issue, and so I must postpone until my next the part which Heth and Pender, of Hill's corps, bore in this day's fight. I will only observe, that no comments of mine are necessary in order to show Lieut. Gen. Ewell's great energy and high military genius, as well as the excellent abilities of his several division commanders.

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Friday, June 26, 1863

THE CAVALRY FRIGHTS
[CORRESPONDENCE OF THE RICHMOND DISPATCH.

Near Middlesboro, June 23, 1863.

The last week—from June 17th to yesterday inclusive—has been characterized by incessant conflicts between the cavalry under Gen. Stuart and the enemy's. Heavy damage has been inflicted upon the latter, and he has received a lesson by which . . . more

THE CAVALRY FRIGHTS
[CORRESPONDENCE OF THE RICHMOND DISPATCH.

Near Middlesboro, June 23, 1863.

The last week—from June 17th to yesterday inclusive—has been characterized by incessant conflicts between the cavalry under Gen. Stuart and the enemy's. Heavy damage has been inflicted upon the latter, and he has received a lesson by which he seems disposed to profit. Nearly a week ago our cavalry drove back the enemy's near Middleburg, too a great number of prisoners, and captured two members of Hooker's staff. Engagements have occurred every day since, but that which took place on June 21st was the most never and one of the hottest of the war. The enemy under Gens. Pleasanton, Stahl, and Barnes, advanced early in the morning with nearly of quite 20,000 cavalry, fifteen regiments of infantry, and four or five batteries, and attacked Gen. Stuart on the Little River Turnpike between Middleburg and Rector's Creas Roads, at the same time moving on his left and endeavoring to cut him off from the mountains. The main body of the enemy, in front on the turnpike, consisting of 10,000 cavalry, three batteries, and two brigades of infantry, advanced with spirit, and deploying their infantry as sharpshooters, made it necessary for our cavalry to fall back. The batteries of both sides were, during this time, hotly engaged, and one piece on our side being struck by a round shot, the horses killed, and the carriage disabled, was abandoned. The enemy's cavalry was very little engaged, comparatively, the infantry and artillery being their chief reliance. Gen. Stuart continued to fall back before this column, withdrawing his forces on the left at the same time, and thus drew them on nearly to Ashby's Gap, the day winding up with a brief but hot charge at Upperville, in which they were driven back and badly hurt.

Yesterday Gen. Stuart advanced in his turn and the enemy continued to retreat before his cavalry and artillery until night. At that time he established his pickets near Aldie, and returned to his former position before the enemy's advance. The appearance of the roads indicates the severe character of the engagements. It is strewed with dead horses and many fresh graves are seen. The loss of the enemy was heavy. It was reported by citizens of Middleburg that the body of Gen. Kilpatrick, one of their most accomplished officers, passed through that night. Many of their field officers were killed, and they undoubtedly suffered heavily. Our own loss was considerable—among others, Lt. Col. Lewis, 9th Va., and Maj Eells, 5th Va., who were killed while gallantly charging near Mountsville.

This and the fight near Brandy Station have been as hard as any during the war. In both the enemy had heavy infantry supports—we none. The result in all the recent engagements has been, on our part, entire success.

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Tuesday, November 24, 1863

FIGHTING COMMENCED AT CHATTANOOGA--OUR PICKETS DRIVEN IN.

[FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.]
Mission Ridge, Nov. 23.

—The enemy massed a very heavy force on our right this morning, and advanced at 2 o'clock, driving in our pickets.

It is not certain yet whether they intend an attack in force or to advance . . . more

FIGHTING COMMENCED AT CHATTANOOGA--OUR PICKETS DRIVEN IN.

[FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.]
Mission Ridge, Nov. 23.

—The enemy massed a very heavy force on our right this morning, and advanced at 2 o'clock, driving in our pickets.

It is not certain yet whether they intend an attack in force or to advance their lines.

Sallust.
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Monday, May 30, 1864

THE BATTLE IN NORTH GEORGIA.

Battle-Field, 18 miles from Marletts, May 28

—Heavy skirmishing began at day light yesterday morning on the left, and continued without intermission until about 5 o'clock, when a desperate assault was made upon Stevenson's division, which was repulsed handsomely, with heavy loss to the . . . more

THE BATTLE IN NORTH GEORGIA.

Battle-Field, 18 miles from Marletts, May 28

—Heavy skirmishing began at day light yesterday morning on the left, and continued without intermission until about 5 o'clock, when a desperate assault was made upon Stevenson's division, which was repulsed handsomely, with heavy loss to the enemy. This is the fourth assault that has been made upon this point, resulting in heavy loss to the enemy. A battery was run up within two hundred yards of Stuart's line, and opened a terrific fire. Our sharpshooters killed every gunner and horse. The battery thus disabled was hastily abandoned. Last night at 12 o'clock the enemy advanced on our extreme right, where they were ambuscaded by Cleburne's division, who followed up with a charge, which routed the enemy completely, leaving 149 prisoners, including a brigade commander, together with their dead and wounded, in our hand. The enemy's lose in this affair was between five and six thousand. The conduct of Granbury's brigade is highly spoken of Granbury received a slight wound, but is still in the field. Brisk skirmishing began again this morning and still continues on the extreme left. The enemy are massing on their left this morning, and heavy firing of artillery continues up to 11 o'clock.

[SECOND DISPATCH]

New Hope, via Marietta, May 28.

—The enemy are massed in our front on the south side of Pumpkin Vine Creek. There was a very heavy artillery and musketry skirmish yesterday, from sunrise to dark, principally on our right wing, when it ceased, and was resumed about midnight. We captured between two and three hundred prisoners, among them Lieut Col Famblies, of the 59th Ohio, Adj't Holter, and three Lieutenants. Our forces are inspirited with great confidence in their commander, and their ability to defeat the enemy. Every man is anxious for a general engagement to take place, which will probably be to-day. Skirmishing is now going on to-night on the right and centre. Lieut Col Fambliss reports General Wallack severely wounded in the action at Reasca.

[THIRD DISPATCH.]

New Hope, May 28th, (via Marietta.)

—Gen Cleburn's division engaged the 4th army corps under Howard, about 1 o'clock this morning, and, after a desperate contest, signally repulsed the enemy, with a loss of between five and seven thousand. We captured between 150 and 200 prisoners, exclusive of wounded, and immense quantities of arms and accoutrements. Gen C says the enemy's dead were piled thicker than he ever saw before. Between 500 and 1,000 dead were left close up to his front. Their line of breastworks in front of Loring's command was abandoned. Our loss will probably number four or five hundred. Skirmishing is still going on, and the enemy's left gradually giving way.

[FOURTH DISPATCH.]

New Hope May 29

—Granbury's brigade was placed in action at 5 P M yesterday when the enemy attempted to turn our flank. We had no defences except a few boughs and stones hastily collected by the cavalry, which held the position as skirmishers before the brigade came up. The engagement immediately became furious, and raged with unabated violence until 8 P M. The enemy's lines were advanced within five paces of ours several times and were at all points repulsed.

Having no support-the brigade was not allowed to hazard its position by a charge until 12 M., when Walthall's brigade arrived and took position immediately in their rear. The charge was then sounded, and the brigade swept through the woods, retaking three lines of battle without firing a gun, and capturing many prisoners.

Bertham's regiment, of Govan's brigade, was detached at 5½ P. M., and sent to the right of Granburry's, which was being out-flanked, arrived in time, charged and drove the enemy.

Bertham's loss was 28 killed and 60 wounded; Granburry's, 36 killed, 125 wounded, and 5 missing. The enemy left 288 dead on the field, and a large number of wounded.—Those dead were all killed by Berkham's Arkansas regiment, which was separated from Granburry's line by an interval of one hundred paces. The loss in Granburry's immediate front is not less than 300 killed, 1,000 to 1,200 wounded, and many captured. The prisoners report Major Gen Howard Johnson and Brig Gen King wounded.

The skirmishing continued until nightfall, the enemy constantly shifting their positions from the centre to the left.

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Wednesday, May 25, 1864

Army of Northern Virginia,
Spotsylvania C. H., May 2nd, 1864.

We had a little excitement last evening, but today all is quiet as a summer morning. It was ascertained yesterday that the enemy was again referring from our left front, where he had been so handsomely repulsed the day before by . . . more

Army of Northern Virginia,
Spotsylvania C. H., May 2nd, 1864.

We had a little excitement last evening, but today all is quiet as a summer morning. It was ascertained yesterday that the enemy was again referring from our left front, where he had been so handsomely repulsed the day before by Gordon, and was moving towards the Richmond and Fredericksburg Railroad. Gen. Lee, nor to allow his adversary to proceed alone, ordered Ewell to advance and strike him in the flank and rear, and thus compel him to return to his former position—Ewell marched cut of the trenches late in the afternoon, and encountered the enemy a little before sunset. A sharp, brief combat ensued, the enemy being thrown into considerable confusion and referring before our troops. It is believed that the attack would have resulted in important captures had all portions of the command behaved equally well, but Jones's brigade, of Johnson's division, which did not stand firmly at the Wilderness, and was the first to break in the great battle of the 12th, fled incontinently, and some report that the Stonewall brigade did not do as well as it might have done. The latter is composed of troops from the Valley of the Shenandoah and the former from counties in Southwestern Virginia. Pegram's brigade, of the same division, on the contrary, displayed much gallantry.

In consequence of the unsteadiness of a portion of the corps here alluded to Ewell did not press his advantages, nor bring off some forty five wagons which he captured. Indeed, finding that the enemy was receiving heavy reinforcements, and it being no part of his instructions to bring on a general engagement within the Federal entrenchments, he returned late at night to his former position, leaving his dead and a portion of his wounded behind. His losses were small, not exceeding one hundred in killed and wounded. Through some oversight the ambulances of the corps did not accompany it, or the wounded might have been removed. The real object of the demonstration, however, was fully accomplished; the movement in the right was checked, and Gen. Grant reduced to the condition of the man who receives unexpected news on a journey, and who stops to search his head, being in doubt which way to turn or what to do, whether to go on or return.

Since different accounts of the attack upon Johnson's division, of Ewell's corps, on the morning of the 12th have been given to the public, and since all of these accounts probably have more or less of error in them. I have applied to an intelligent officer who was present throughout the battle, and who was in a position to understand what was going on as fully as Gen. Ewell himself, for the facts so far as they fell under his own eye. The following is the substance of the statement of the officer to whom I made application:

On the morning of the 12th Johnson's division occupied the right of Ewell's corps. Haves's brigade being on his left; then J. M. Walkers, (Stonewall,) next Jones's. And then Stewart's. At the junction of Jones's and Stewart's brigades, the line of works made a bend at nearly a right angle, in which a battalion of artillery had been posted.—The artillery had been withdrawn the proceeding evening, and the line of Jones's brigade was extended to cover this gap. At 3 o'clock on the morning of the 12th, Johnson asked for artillery, saying the enemy was massing heavily in his front, and Page's battalion was started to him. Jones's brigade of six regiments had but three in line when the assault was made at 4 o'clock; one had been detached to cover the gap of half a mile between Stewart's brigade and Lane's brigade of Wilcox's division in the right, one had been deployed as skirmishers, another had just been sent out to relieve the latter. The enemy made their attack in mess with a rush upon the point where the artillery had been, and the three regiments of Jones's brigade gave way almost without firing a shot. The artillery which had been sent was just driving up to the works at a gallop as the enemy poured over, killing the horses and preventing the men from unlimbering their guns, and capturing the guns and Gen. Johnson, who was endeavoring to rally his command. As the enemy rushed in, the Stonewall brigade; on the left of the gap, and part of Stewart's, of the right of it, received them with a heavy fire, but the enemy closing down on Stewart on the flank, front, and rear, succeeded in taking the larger part of his command in the works. In attempting to swing around his brigade, so as to oppose the enemy in front Gen. Walker was severely wounded and carried from the field. The senior Colonel not being aware of this, there was no head to the brigade, and each regiment from right to left continued to fight at the works until its flank was turned, inflicting heavy loss on the foe, and losing much themselves. The enemy still pressing his advantages, Johnston's North Carolina brigade, of Gordon's command, was put in on the right of the Louisiana (late Stafford's) brigade, near the Stonewall brigade, and succeeded in checking the enemy for a time. The loss of Johnson's division was about 2,000 prisoners and eighteen pieces of artillery, besides the killed and wounded.

The enemy had now gained possession of a wood within our works, and advanced nearly a quarter of a mile from the works to McCoul's house. At this point Gordon threw in three regiments of his Georgia brigade near McCoul's house at a charge, who struck the enemy in front and on their left and drove those they met out of the works and over them. The Federals being thus checked, he formed the other three regiments of his brigade, and Pegram's Virginia brigade, and put them in on the right of the other three regiments, and pushed back the enemy in splendid style, regaining Stewart's and parts of Jones's line and the artillery.—This position they continued to hold during the day against repeated assaults, although their left was never supported by other troops. A little after Gordon had gone in, Ramseur's North Carolina brigade, of Rodes's division, made a magnificent charge upon the enemy's right as they poured through the works, driving them out with slaughter and retaking the line of the Louisiana and part of the Stonewall brigade, and here they stood all day.

Although these troops were doing splendidly, there was still a gap of some length between Ramseur's right and Pegram's left, where the enemy held our works, and through this they continued to press. To close this gap and regain our whole line and the artillery, there was desperate fighting. Battle's Alabama brigade, of Rodes's division, was thrown in on Ramseur's right his centre passing the McCoul house, and drove the enemy back some distance into the wood, gaining a foot hold in the wood which they resolutely held.

The enemy now occupied the outside of our works, on the crest where Jones's brigade broke, and our line was along the works of the Stonewall brigade, and there broke off towards the right through the woods, and nearly to Pegram's left—Again and again the enemy made desperate efforts to drive out the Confederates and press through the gap still existing, but they failed. Harris's Mississippi brigade was sent up at this time, and put in on Ramseur's right, over the same ground as Battle's, and it drove the enemy from another portion of the works; and the ground thus regained they held for the remainder of the day. Subsequently Perrin's and McGowan's South Carolina brigades were brought up and put in on the right of Harris, and still later the remnant of Johnson's division moved up to close the gap between Pegram's left and the right of the other troops to about one hundred yards in the angle of the works which the enemy continued to hold, and from which we did not succeed in busting them. Our artillery was so far regained as to enable Major Curshaw to take his artillery men to the pieces and work them during the rest of the day with marked effect upon the enemy; but the courses having all been killed, and the enemy's sharpshooters being near, the guns could not be withdrawn. During these operations we captured on this part of the lines about 1,000 prisoners, from every corps in the Federal army.—Our captures during the day were quite equal to those made by the enemy.

It is apparent from this brief narrative that, while we did not regain the whole of our lines, we should probably not have lost any part of them if the artillery had been in position when the assault was made.

No one has been appointed to succeed Gen. Stuart, the cavalry for the present, under an order from Gen. Lee, reporting to him by divisions.—Hampton is the ranking officer of that arm of the service in Virginia.

I fear my letters have reached you irregularly, owing to the recent interruption of our communications. I have written promptly, however, and have done all in my power to get them through in time. Sallost.

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Friday, May 08, 1863

THE GREAT BATTLES IN THE VICINITY OF CHANCELLORSVILLE.
PREPARATIONS FOR THE FIGHT.
GEN. JACKSON FLANKING THE ENEMY
THE YANKEES DRIVEN FROM THEIR ENTRENCHMENTS.
DESPERATE FIGHTING ON SUNDAY
HEAVY LOSS ON BOTH SIDES.
&c., &c., &c.,

For the present when all is confusion, it is somewhat difficult to give anything like an accurate or connected . . . more

THE GREAT BATTLES IN THE VICINITY OF CHANCELLORSVILLE.
PREPARATIONS FOR THE FIGHT.
GEN. JACKSON FLANKING THE ENEMY
THE YANKEES DRIVEN FROM THEIR ENTRENCHMENTS.
DESPERATE FIGHTING ON SUNDAY
HEAVY LOSS ON BOTH SIDES.
&c., &c., &c.,

For the present when all is confusion, it is somewhat difficult to give anything like an accurate or connected account of the series of battles which have taken place on the Rappahannock within the past week, and which have again crowned the arms of our infant Confederacy with undying renown. Such information as we have been able to gather, we lay before the reader this morning, and think we hazard nothing in saying that it approaches nearer to accuracy than any account yet published of the grand series of movements which has rolled back once more the tide of fanatical invasion, and hurled, discomfited and dismayed, across the Rappahannock the boasting hosts of the enemy.

As early as Thursday of last week information was received at headquarters that the enemy was crossing in force at Germanna and Banks's ford, when infantry were at once sent up to the vicinity of Tabernacle Church to co-operate with our cavalry in that neighborhood. On Friday, at an early hour in the morning, it became apparent that the main force of the enemy had crossed at the above fords, and that his principal demonstrations were to be made from that quarter. Consequently all of our troops, with the exception of Early's division and Barksdale's brigade, left the lines in front of Fredericksburg and marched towards Tabernacle Church. On arriving at the plank road the troops were hailed, and partial line of battle formed, and reconnoitering parties and skirmishers sent in advance to ascertain the position of the enemy. Pretty soon the guns of the skirmishers were heard, indicating the near presence of the enemy, who, however, retired, with little resistance, pursued by our own forces along the plank road, where at intervals there was heavy firing of artillery and musketry, but no general engagement. That night our troops gained the summit of a ridge running nearly at right angles with the plank road, and within a mile and a half of Chancellorsville, a commanding position of the enemy. This point is at the intersection of the plank road with the old Catharine Furnace road. On the same day the division of General McLaws engaged the enemy near Banks's ford, driving him from his position there, forcing him to move by the right flank up the river until a junction was formed with the main body of his forces, near Chancellorsville.

On Saturday the divisions of McLaws and Anderson, remained on this line, and in the enemy's front, while Gen. Jackson, at the head of his corps moved to the left along the Furnance road, passing around the enemy's right, and gaining the plank road in his rear. Crossing the plank road, he assailed and carried the enemy's first line of entrenchments by a flank movement, capturing several pieces of artillery, and a number of prisoners. The enemy, driven out of these retreated in the direction of Chancellorsville, followed by our forces who had dislodged them, until they reached the top of a hill some three hundred yards distant, where they again offered resistance, but finding themselves too hotly pressed, soon yielded, and fell back about a mile to their second line of rifle pits, of entrenchments, which were constructed of heavy timbers with earth thrown over them. In approaching these works, which occurred about nightfall, our troops had to encounter almost insurmountable barriers. The ascent for two hundred yards was very slight, a small sluggish stream running at the foot of this ascent, between which and the works the ground was of a marshy character, covered with an undergrowth of thick shrubbery—the heavy timber around having been felled so as to form a kind of abattis, over and through which our forces had to climb.

The works were, however, carried about 8 o'clock P. M., and held for a short time. As our troops were moving along the plank road near this point heavy volleys of musketry from ambuscades were poured upon them, and finally a battery of four guns, posted on a hill some two hundred yards in advance of the head of the column, opened upon them with grape and canister, fora time checking their advance and wounding a number of officers and men. The enemy then rallied and repossessed himself of the works from which he had been driven, our forces falling back a short distance during the night. On the same day a portion of the corps of Gen. Jackson gained possession of several fords on the river, in rear of the enemy.

On Sunday the battle opened early in the morning Gen. Paxton, of the Stonewall brigade, was killed before a gun had been fired by his command. The line of works regained by the enemy the night previous were a second time assaulted and carried about 8 o'clock. Our columns pushing on, the enemy was driven from his third line of breastworks, in charging which, at some points, our loss was very severe, the troops being exposed not only to a heavy discharge of musketry, but also to a terrible and destructive fire of artillery, from the ridge at Chancellorsville, distant about half a mile, where the enemy had strongly entrenched himself. About the middle of the day, however, he was driven from this position, after desperate and criminate resistance. At one point, rather commanding, the struggle was truly desperate—three times was the enemy driven from his position, and as often regained it; but after the fourth charge of our invincible soldiery, they yielded the position without further effort to maintain it.

Falling back some distance beyond Chancellorsville, their lines were reformed, and position taken on the summit of an eminence in a northerly direction from the village, and near the old turnpike road. Very soon the guns of the skirmishers were again heard, followed by the artillery of the enemy, directed at our columns then leaving Chancellorsville. They, however, gave way without risking another general engagement, and on this end of the line the heavy fighting of the day was ended. Nothing, beyond the events here described, has since transpired, with the exception of occasional artillery duelling.

Whilst these operations were in progress on the upper line, Gen. Early's division was hotly engaged in front of Fredericksburg. During the afternoon of Sunday the enemy succeeded in carrying Marye's Heights, where they captured some 200 of our men belonging to a Mississippi regiment, and several pieces of the Washington Artillery. The next morning Gen. E. was reinforced by the division of Gen. McLaws and part of the division of Gen. Anderson, when the heights were assailed and car-

ried, and our artillery recaptures. Soon after our troops regained possession of the town which at last accounts was held by Gen. Law ton's brigade. The fighting on the end of the line of Monday was very Maryland prisoners who were captured report that they lost in the several engagements three Major-Generals viz: Slocum, Birney and Howood.

Since Monday there has been no heavy fighting on either end of the line. The following telegram from Gen. Lee will beat explain the present whereabouts of the enemy.

Chancellorsville May 7, 1862
To His Excellency President Davis:

After driving General Sedgwick across the Rappahannock, on the night of the 4th inst. I returned on the 5th to Chancellorsville. The march was delayed by a stores, which continued all night and the following day. In placing the troops in position on the morning of the 6th to attack Gen. Hooker, it was ascertained he had abandoned his fortified position. The line of skirmishers was pressed forward until they came within ange of the enemy's batteries, planted fort of the Rappahannock, which, from the configuration of the ground, completely commenced the side. His army therefore, escaped with the loss of a few additional prisoners.

(Signed) R. E. Lee. General.
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Saturday, March 19, 1864

PENNSYLVANIA CAMPAIGN--SECOND DAY AT GETTYSBURG.

[FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.]
Army of Northern Virginia, March 18th, 1864.

In two previous letters I have adverted to the parts which Ewell's corps, and Heth and Pender, of Hill's corps, bore in the first day's fight at Gettysburg. To-day I propose to speak of the . . . more

PENNSYLVANIA CAMPAIGN--SECOND DAY AT GETTYSBURG.

[FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.]
Army of Northern Virginia, March 18th, 1864.

In two previous letters I have adverted to the parts which Ewell's corps, and Heth and Pender, of Hill's corps, bore in the first day's fight at Gettysburg. To-day I propose to speak of the second day's fight. Pickett's division of Longstreet's corps crossed the Potomac on the 25th. Hood and McLaws, of the same corps, on the 26th, and these three divisions reached Chambersburg on the 27th of June. Here the whole corps remained for two days. From this point Hood and McLaws moved to Greenwood. Pickett was left at Chambersburg to guard and bring up the rear. On the 1st of July the corps received orders to move to Gettysburg. It was detained, however, several hours by Johnson's division and the train of wagons which came into the road from Shippensburg. McLaws's division, notwithstanding this delay, reached Marsh Creek, four miles from Gettysburg, soon after dark on the evening of the 1st July. Hood's division got within nearly the same distance by the same time, (except Law's brigade, which had been on picket at Guildford, on the road to Emmittsburg, and returned about noon on the 2d) General Pickett had not yet gotten up.

About noon of the 2d Lieut. Gen Longstreet began a movement which he had previously been ordered by Gen, Lee to make, viz: To move around and gain the Emmittsburg road on the enemy's left. The enemy having been driven back by the corps of Lieuts Gen Ewell and Hill on the first day, had taken up a strong position extending from Cemetery hill along the Emmittsburg road. On account of the difficulty of finding a route by which the movement could be made without being observed, McLaws did not get into position opposite the enemy's left until about 4 o'clock Hood's division was moved further to our right, and was placed in position partially enveloping the enemy's left. Cabell's battalion of artillery, with McLaws's division and Henry's battalion of artillery, with Hood's division, opened at once upon the enemy.—Hood at the same moment moved forward, pressing the enemy upon his left, whilst McLaws attacked the enemy in front. The enemy was soon driven back upon a commanding hill, which was so steep and rough that ascent was most difficult. At the base of this hill were numerous stone fences, behind which the enemy sought shelter, and these they held with great pertinacity. The enemy were, however, driven from point to point until nearly night, when a very strong force of them met some brigades of Anderson's division, of A. P. Hill's corps, driving back one of them and king another. Backs dale's brigade, of McLaws's division, was also driven back at the same time.

A portion of Hood's division, which had driven the enemy to the precipitous part of the mountain, was repulsed about dark with considerable loss. After this the troops were withdrawn to the position from which they had first driven the enemy. During the fight of this day Lieut. Gen. Longstreet was with and superintended the movements of McLaws's division, leading the charge of Wofford's brigade in the attack on the enemy's first position on the Emmittsburg road, and was exposed to a heavy fire of artillery and musketry during the action.

During the fight this evening Longstreet's corps captured two pieces of artillery, several hundred prisoners, and two stands of colors, with heavy loss, however. Major General Hood was severely wounded, as was Brig. Gen. G. T. Anderson, of Hood's division. Brig. Gen. Barksdale, of McLaws's di of the same division, was mortally wounded, but has since died, and fully one half of the field and line officers of these divisions were either killed or wounded in this evening's engagement.

The line of battle on this day was formed with Ewell on the extreme left, and Longstreet on the extreme right, with A. P. Hill in the centre. We have hurriedly and imperfectly alluded to the battle as fought on the right; let us now look after the enemy on Ewell's front, and see how he has disposed of them. All was ready on this end of the line to attack at 8 o'clock in the morning, but word having been received that Longstreet would not be ready for some hours, the whole of the artillery that could be brought to bear, was placed into position, the ground carefully reconnoitred, and every precaution taken to ensure success. Andrews's battalion of artillery, under Major Latimer, was placed in position on a hill, from which the batteries on Cemetery Hill, fronting the scene of the first day's fight, were taken in reverse, and two 25 pounder Parrott guns, belonging to the reserve artillery of the corps, were placed on the same ridge, 600 or 800 yards to their rear. Some of the other artillery of the corps was posted near the seminary, just to the right of the Middletown road; but finding its position unsuitable for doing much against the enemy, they fired only occasionally, in order to draw the fire of the enemy.

About four o'clock in the evening, Longstreet's guns away to the right announced that the battle was opened, and from that time until night there was kept up one of the most magnificently grand and terribly loud cannonades ever heard, far more terrific than at Malvern Hill, though by no means so destructive to us.

Latimer's guns taking the enemy's in reverse, whilst those on Hill's front and on the right were engaged with them in front, completely silenced the enemy for nearly half an hour, but they soon put thirty or forty guns in position against him, and by far greater weight of metal and superiority of position, so damaged Latimer's guns, as to compel his withdrawal from the field after a contest of one and a half hours, except one battery which he kept to rebel any advance of the enemy's infantry. He himself remained with this battery and received the wound which resulted in his death, from one of the last shells which the enemy threw. His arm was much shattered, rendering necessary amputation above the elbow. He bore the operation with much cheerfulness of spirits, and seemed to be rapidly recovering when secondary hemorrhage ensued. He had now been removed to Harrisonburg, Virginia, and at this point he died after lingering some six or seven days. His immediate commander, in speaking of him, said "no greater loss could have befallen the artillery of this corps." This was emphatically true. He was at the time of his death not more than twenty-one years of age, yet there was no better officer in the whole of this army or one more highly esteemed.

Just as Latimer ceased firing, Johnson's infantry was ordered forward to the attack. It was now not more than on half an hour before sunset. In passing down the hill on which they had been posted, and whilst crossing the creek they were much annoyed by the fire to which they were subjected from the enemy's artillery, which, from Cemetery hill, poured nearly an enfilade fire upon them. The creek was wide, and its banks steep, so that our men had to break ranks in order to cross it. Having passed the creek, and getting close under the hill which the enemy occupied, Gen. J. M. Jones, who was on the right, reformed his line and advanced steadily up the hill to the attack; but before the brigade had proceeded very far Gen. Jones was wounded, and his senior Colonel being also shot about the same time, the brigade was for awhile without a commander, and was thrown into some confusion, and finally retired a short distance. The Louisiana brigade of General Nichols, (Col. J. M. Williams commanding,) conformed their movements to those of Gen. Jones's. On the extreme left General G H Stewart's brigade was more successful. Pushing around to the enemy's left, he enfiladed and drove the enemy from a breastwork they had built in order to defend their right flank, and which ran at right angles to the rest of their lines up the mountain side. The enemy, however, quickly moved forward a force in order to retake it, but were repulsed, our troops occupying their own breastworks in order to receive their attack. It was now dark, and Gen. Stewart made no further effort to advance, the ground being now to him, and very rugged and precipitous.

Gen. Early, upon hearing Gen. Johnson's infantry engaged, sent forward Hayes's Louisiana and Hoke's North Carolina brigade, (under Col. Avery.) These troops advancing as a storming party, quickly passed over a ridge and down a hill in a valley below they met two lines of the Federals posted behind stone walls. These they charged. At the charge the Federals broke and fled up the hill, closely pursued by our men. (The enemy, after repulsing Gen. Jones's brigade of Virginians, pushed a column down the valley, between them and Gen. Early, with the view of turning Jones's right Bank, but hearing Early's guns they hastily returned.) It was now dark. But Hayes and Avery, still pursuing, pushed the enemy up the hill and stormed the Cemetery heights. Says a most intelligent spectator, who witnessed this charge, "I have never seen or heard anything more intensely exciting and terrible than this contest now became. From the point where I stood, just outside of the town, lighted up by the flashes of the enemy's guns, thirty or forty pieces, perhaps more, were firing grape and canister with inconceivable rapidity at Early's column. It must have been that they imagined it to have been a general and simultaneous advance, for they opened on our men in three or four directions besides that which they were attacking. Fortunately, in the darkness they overshot, and our men did not suffer very severely. Hayes's and Hoke's brigades pressed on and captured two or three lines of breast works and three or four of their batteries of artillery. For a few moments every gun of the enemy on the heights was silenced, but by the time Gen. Hayes could get his command together a dark line appeared in front of them and on either flank a few yards off. The true situation soon became clear. The Yankees were bringing up at least a division to retake the works. Gen. Hayes, being unsupported by the troops on his right, (which were from Hill's corps,) was compelled to fail back, bringing with him four stands of captured colors and some seventy five prisoners." Col. Avery, 6th N. C. troops, commanding Hoke's brigade, was killed in this attack.

It is believed that if this attack had been supported by a simultaneous one on our right, different results would have followed. Maj Gen. Rodes commenced to advance simultaneously with Gen. Early. He had, however, more than double the distance of Early to go, and being unsupported by the troops on his right who made no advance, he consequently moved slower than he would have done had he have been supported. Before reaching the enemy's works Early had been repulsed, and so Gen Rodes halted, thinking it useless to attack, since he was unsupported, especially as the enemy had heavy reinforcements just coming up and over a hundred guns which could be brought to bear on the line of Rodes's advance.

When the second day closed this was the position of Ewell's corps. Johnson's left had gained important ground, part of it being a very short distance from the top of the mountain, which, if once gained, would command the whole of the enemy's position; but his right had made no progress. Early's attack, almost a brilliant success, had produced no results, and he occupied nearly his former position. Rodes, having advanced nearly halfway to the enemy's works, and finding these good cover for his troops, he remained in the occupancy of his advanced position.

This was the condition of affairs on our extreme right and left. Hill during this day occupied the centre, and only a part of his corps was actively engaged. Late in the afternoon of this day, whilst Lieut. General Longstreet's corps and a portion of Major Gen. Anderson's division were assaulting the enemy's left, Major Gen. Pender having ridden to the extreme right of his command to put them in the fight, should the opportunity offer, received a severe wound in the leg from the fragment of a shell. The wound, at first pronounced not dangerous, subsequently proved fatal. Words from the writer in eulogy of this brave and accomplished officer are unnecessary. Speaking of him in his preliminary report of Gettysburg, Gen. Lee says: "This lamented officer has borne a distinguished part in every engagement of this army and while leading his command with conspicuous gallantry and ability. The confidence and admiration inspired by his courage and capacity as an officer were only equalled by the esteem and respect entertained by all with whom he was associated for the noble qualities of his modest and unassuming character."

Early in the morning of the 2d July, Wilcox's brigade began to take position, but finding that three regiments of Yankee sharp shooters had anticipated them and were occupying the position they had intended to take, Wilcox's men engaged the Yankees, and after a sharp fight drove them off, and occupied the ground from which the Yankees had just been driven. This brigade, with Perry and Wilcox, were formed on the right of Hill's corps, and the left of Longstreet's being joined on to Barksdale's brigade, of McLaws's division. —After the sport of a fight in the morning the troops of these brigades rested until about four o'clock, when the attack begun on the right and gradually extended around to the left. After Barksdale's brigade, of McLaws's division, had been engaged for some time, Wilcox, Wright and Perry, were ordered forward, encountering a line of the enemy, and soon putting them to rout. Still pressing forward these three brigades met with another and stronger line of the enemy, backed by twelve pieces of artillery. No pause was made. The line moved rapidly forward and captured the artillery. The enemy, however, fought with greater obstinacy than usual, and their artillery mowed down our men at every discharge. On reaching, however, a ravine (some three or four hundred yards beyond the captured artillery) of dense bushes, it was discovered that the enemy had another heavy line of battle immediately on the other side, with a large amount of artillery posted on the ridge behind them. Upon our reaching this ravine the enemy attempted to drive us away by a charge, but were repulsed with heavy loss. Seeing the weakened condition of our men, another fresh line of battle was thrown forward by the enemy, but after an obstinate fight was repulsed. And now the condition of our troops became critical in the extreme. Wilcox, Perry and Wright had charged most gallantly over a distance of more than three quarters of a mile, breaking two or three of the enemy's lines of battles and capturing two or three batteries of artillery. Of course our lines were greatly thinned and our troops much exhausted. By strange mismanagement, as yet unexplained, no reinforcements were sent to this column by the Lieut-General commanding. Perhaps when the official report of Lieut.-General Hill shall be given to the public, the whole matter will be made clear. Again the enemy made a third and most determined effort to force us back, and having succeeded in driving back. Barksdale on the right of these brigades, they in turn were of necessity compelled to retreat.

It was now dark, and our troops were repulsed at all points save where Brig General Stewart held his ground. A second day of desperate fighting and correspondingly frightful carnage was ended. But our noble commanding General still believed himself and his brave army capable of taking these commanding heights, and thus to be able to dictate a peace on the soil of the free States. With what success this was attempted, it will become us to inquire in our next, when we shall account the events of the third day's fight at Gettysburg. X.

The information in regard to this part of Longstreet's corps is not as full as I could have desired. I am promised fuller information in regard to this corps, which I hope to get in time for the book in regard to this campaign, which the writer is preparing.

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