weather

Topic modeling identifies topics, and it also provides a proportional breakdown of the often multiple topics that each individual article or advertisement addressed. This chart shows the changing percentage of print space for this topic in the paper as a whole—for each month the topic proportions for "weather" in all articles containing that topic are added together and then divided by the total number of pieces published that month to calculate a percentage value.

You can also adjust the articles that the above chart takes into account. By default, articles and advertisements that have only a small proportion of their content in this category are included in the chart. Each individual article has a negligible effect, but small proportions in dozens or hundred of articles can add up. Use the controls below the chart to adjust the threshold of the articles charted. You can also choose to chart the summation of the topic proportion of all articles (which makes sense for a topic that's more of a theme) or you can choose to chart the raw count of all articles above your specified threshold (which might be preferable when looking at a topic that's more generic in nature). For the latter kind of chart, you'll likely want to adjust the threshold to something like 20% or 30%.

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Predictive Words

WATER LONG DAY TIME HALF COLD SIDE AIR WEATHER GREAT LIGHT GROUND PLACE WHITE SUN DEEP DAYS NIGHT FACE HAND STORM LAY PASSED SCENE

This list of words are those that the topic model identifies as most likely to appear in documents in this category.

Exemplary Articles

article
83%
1
Thursday, January 15, 1863

LINES ON THE MARCH.


A soldier lay on the frozen ground,
With only a blanket tightened around
His

article
75%
2
Wednesday, August 07, 1861

Almost a Storm.

—The "yawn of bellowing clouds" came to us yesterday in a big demonstration of rolling thunder and vivid lightning, followed by a shower of rain.

article
72%
3
Saturday, March 16, 1861

The First Violet.


When heaviest lay the winter snow,
The hidden leaves were green;
Above, the bitter blast might blow,
But little cared the floweriet low,
Beneath its ample screen.

The old oak, round its shoulders bare,
Its tattered mantle drew;
Grim relic of the year's despair—
While, . . . more

The First Violet.


When heaviest lay the winter snow,
The hidden leaves were green;
Above, the bitter blast might blow,
But little cared the floweriet low,
Beneath its ample screen.

The old oak, round its shoulders bare,
Its tattered mantle drew;
Grim relic of the year's despair—
While, hopeful in its sheltered lair,
The budding violet grow.

Under blue skies and sunlight, mild
March, with its balmiest breath,
Upon the snow-drifts breathed and smiled,
And through them looked the winter's child,
Life in the arms of death.

article
72%
4
Saturday, January 14, 1865

MISSING.


In the cool sweet hush of a wooded nock,
Where the May buds sprinkle the green old sward,
And the winds, and the birds, and the limpid brook,
Murmur their dreams with a drowsy sound;
Who lies so still in the plushy moss,
With his pale cheek pressed on a breezy pillow,
Coached . . . more

MISSING.


In the cool sweet hush of a wooded nock,
Where the May buds sprinkle the green old sward,
And the winds, and the birds, and the limpid brook,
Murmur their dreams with a drowsy sound;
Who lies so still in the plushy moss,
With his pale cheek pressed on a breezy pillow,
Coached where the light and the shadows cross
Through the flickering fringes of the willow,
Who lies, alas!
So still, so chill, in the whispering grass!

A soldier chap, in the Zouave dress,
A bright-haired man, with his lips apart,
One hand thrown up o'er his frank dead face,
And the other clutching his pulseless heart,
Lies here in the shadows, cool and dim,
His musket swept by a trailing bough;
With a careless grace in his quiet limbs,
And a wound on his manly brow;
A wound, alas!
Whence the warm blood drips on the quiet grass.

The violets peer from their dusky beds,
With a tearful dew in their great pure eyes;
The lilies quiver their shining heads;
Their pale lips full of sad surprise;
And the lizard darts through the glistening fern,
And the squirrel rustles the branches hoary;
Strange birds fly out, with a cry, to bathe
Their wings in the sunset glory;
While the shadows pass
O'er the quiet face and the dewy grass.

God pity the bride who waits at home,
With her lily cheeks and her violet eyes,
Dreaming the sweet old dream of love,
While her lover is walking in Paradise;
God strengthen her heart as the days go by,
And the long dreary nights of her vigil fellow;
No bird, nor moon, nor whispering wind
May breathe the tale of the hollow;
Alas! alas!
The secret is safe with the woodland grass.

article
71%
5
Saturday, January 04, 1862

Wintry Weather.

—The leaden-hued clouds and chilly atmosphere gave promise of snow yesterday, but the winter's fury was not wasted in that way. The blockade or some other cause has thus far kept out the Northern blast, but it may yet come thicker, faster and more of it, for . . . more

Wintry Weather.

—The leaden-hued clouds and chilly atmosphere gave promise of snow yesterday, but the winter's fury was not wasted in that way. The blockade or some other cause has thus far kept out the Northern blast, but it may yet come thicker, faster and more of it, for all that.

Last night we had hail and rain by turns.

article
70%
6
Tuesday, December 12, 1865

MINIATURE ALMANAC.

December 12, 1865,

Sun rises7.16
Sun sets4.44
Moon rises (morn)1.51
High water11.42

article
70%
7
Monday, April 29, 1861

Hot.

—The cool and bracing wind was not strong enough yesterday to divert the hot rays of the sun from being reflected in a most uncomfortably warm manner from the cobble Stone street, brick pavements, and walls of houses.

article
69%
8
Saturday, January 14, 1865

MISSING.


In the cool sweet hush of a wooded nook,
Whore the May beds sprinkle the green old sward,
And the winds, and the birds, and the limpid brook,
Murmur their dreams with a drowsy sound;
Who lies so still in the plushy moss,
With his pale check pressed on a breezy pillow,
Couched where . . . more

MISSING.


In the cool sweet hush of a wooded nook,
Whore the May beds sprinkle the green old sward,
And the winds, and the birds, and the limpid brook,
Murmur their dreams with a drowsy sound;
Who lies so still in the plushy moss,
With his pale check pressed on a breezy pillow,
Couched where the light and the shadows cross
Through the flickering fringes of the willow,
Who lies, alas!
So still, so chill, in the whispering grass!

A soldier chap, in the Zouave dress,
A bright-haired man, with his lips apart,
One hand thrown up o'er his frank dead face,
And the other clutching his pulseless heart,
Lies here in the shadows, cool and dim,
His musket swept by a trailing bough;
With a careless grace in his quiet limbs,
And a wound on his manly brow;
A wound, alas!
Whence the warm blood drips on the quiet grass.

The violets peer from their dusky beds,
With a tearful dew in their great pure eyes;
The lilies quiver their shining heads,
Their pale lips full of sad surprise;
And the lizard darts through the glistening fern,
And the squirrel rustles the branches hoary;
Strange birds fly out, with a cry, to bathe
Their wings in the sunset glory;
While the shadows pass
O'er the quiet face and the dewy grass.

God pity the bride who waits at home,
With her lily cheeks and her violet eyes,
Dreaming the sweet old dream of love,
While her lover is walking in Paradise;
God strengthen her heart as the days go by,
And the long dreary nights of her vigil fellow;
No bird, nor moon, nor whispering wind
May breathe the tale of the hollow;
Alas! alas!
The secret is safe with the woodland grass.

article
69%
9
Monday, May 27, 1861

Hot.

—Yesterday was an uncomfortably hot day. The Thermometer ranged from 82 to 100 in the sun. A cool breeze tempered down the atmosphere to walking consistency.

article
68%
10
Thursday, May 23, 1861

How to be Weather-Wise.

—Whether clear or cloudy, a rosy sky at sunset presages fine weather; a red sky in the morning bad weather, or much wind, (perhaps rain;) a grey sky in the morning, fine weather; a high dawn, wind; a low dawn, fair weather. Soft looking . . . more

How to be Weather-Wise.

—Whether clear or cloudy, a rosy sky at sunset presages fine weather; a red sky in the morning bad weather, or much wind, (perhaps rain;) a grey sky in the morning, fine weather; a high dawn, wind; a low dawn, fair weather. Soft looking or delicate clouds foretell fine weather, with moderate or light breezes; hard-edged, oily-looking clouds, wind. A dark, gloomy, blue sky is windy; but a light, bright blue sky indicates fine weather. Generally, the softer clouds look the less wind, but perhaps, more rain may be expected; and the harder, more greasy, rolled, tufted or ragged, the stronger the coming wind will prove. Also, a bright yellow sky at sunset presages wind, a pale yellow, wet; and thus, by the prevalence of red, yellow or grey tints, the coming weather may be foretold very nearly; indeed, if aided by instruments, almost exactly.—Small, inky-looking clouds foretell rain; but if alone, may indicate wind only.—High upper clouds crossing the sun, moon, stars, in a direction different from that of the lower clouds, or the wind then below, foretell a change of wind. When sea-birds fly out early, and far to seaward, moderate winds and fair weather may be expected; when they hang about the land, or over it, sometimes flying inland, expect a strong wind with stormy weather. There are other signs of a coming change in the weather, known less generally than may be desirable, and therefore worth notice; such as when birds of long flight, rooks, swallows, and others, hang about home, and fly up and down, and low—rain or wind may be expected. Also when animals seek shelter places, instead of spreading over their usual range; when pigs carry straw to their styes; when smoke from chimneys does not ascend readily (or straight upward during calm), an unfavorable change is probable. Dew is an indication of fine weather; so is fog. Neither of these two formations occur under an overcast sky, or when there is much wind. One sees fog occasionally rolled away, as it were, by the wind, but seldom or never formed while it is blowing.

In this column are pieces from the Daily Dispatch that best exemplified this topic; i.e. they had the highest topic proportions in this category. The pie chart to the right of each piece identifies the specific topic proportion for "weather in the piece." You can view the complete topic proportion breakdown for an individual piece by clicking on the title. The handle slider handle on the bottom left of the chart can be adjusted to view articles and advertisements best exemplifying this topic for particular months.